Bsos Graduation Plan Assignment

Africa Program Description

The Wilson Center Africa Program enhances the understanding of critical African policy issues within the United States in order to build stronger, more mutually beneficial U.S.-Africa relations. The Africa Program centers its work on four programmatic pillars:

• Good Governance and Leadership

• Conflict Prevention, Peacebuilding, and Security

• Trade, Investment, and Sustainable Development

• Africa’s Evolving Role in the Global Arena

Underlying these pillars is a cross-cutting focus on the roles of women, youth, and technology in Africa’s changing political and economic landscape.

Communications Internship Description

The communications intern will work directly with the Africa Program Staff in support of project activities for a minimum of 20 hours per week. The work will be approximately 60% copy-editing, research, and communications support; 30% social media, design, and writing; 10% administrative. Duties will include

• Assisting the Communications Assistant with the program blog, Africa Up Close, including updating a post schedule, copyediting and formatting articles for posting, and selecting freely available photos for use.

• Conducting web and social media analytics using Google Analytics and built-in social media analytics and tracking and reporting media coverage in support of program reporting.

• Drafting posts for Africa Program social media accounts on Twitter and Facebook to promote Africa Program events, publications, and other content.

• Assisting with the copyediting and design of reports and briefs from Africa Program scholars and contributors for publication, using established InDesign templates.

• Drafting language for event invitations and publication announcements for the Africa Program mailing list and website and creating targeted mailing lists.

• Assisting with formatting, configuring, and proofing email campaigns to the Africa Program’s mailing list using Marketo.

• Supporting Africa Program events planning and background research, including drafting materials and completing background research for public events, private roundtable discussions, and conferences.

• Providing logistical support for the Program’s events, workshops, conferences, and meetings, including photographing and live-tweeting Africa Program events and updating Africa Program contact database with event attendees.

• Maintaining and updating the Program’s communications database.

• Updating the team on trending topics related to Africa and U.S.-Africa policy.

• Providing background research on interview topics in response to media requests, as necessary.

All interns at the Wilson Center are also encouraged to participate in our many panel discussions, conferences, and other meetings outside of their Africa Program responsibilities. A variety of events are regularly available in regional studies and functional issues like conflict resolution, women’s leadership, environmental issues, Congress, and governance. All interns also receive access to the Wilson Center’s substantial research resources.

Summer internships from May/June – August

Application Deadlines and Procedure

Applications are due no later than 11:59PM EST on March 30

Qualifications

•Background in Africa and Africa-related issues, and preferably some academic, professional, or experience related to this focus.

• Software skills including Adobe Creative Suite (particularly Adobe InDesign, Lightroom, and Illustrator), WordPress, Drupal, Google Analytics, basic HTML, mass email mailing lists, Microsoft Outlook, Excel, Word, and PowerPoint, and social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter.

• Media production and graphic design skills a plus, including any experience with photography; photo, video, and audio editing; or graphic or page design.

• Attention to detail, initiative, good problem solving skills, and an enthusiastic, responsible approach to unsupervised work are necessary.

• Ability to multi-task and adapt to changing tasks and schedules is desirable.

• Experience with copyediting publications and written work is desirable.

• Excellent, error-free writing skills is a must.

• MA candidates encouraged to apply; however, applicants who have just completed a BA or are in their senior undergraduate year will also be considered.

Please Note: International students studying in the U.S. are eligible, but they must hold a valid F-1 or J-1 visa and appropriate work authorization. All international students must obtain written permission from their Designated School Official or Responsible Officer for visas at their university stating that they are in valid immigration status and eligible to do an internship at the Center.

Apply here.

The College of Behavioral and Social Sciences offers 11 majors in 10 departments, three of which are Limited Enrollment Programs (LEP). All majors in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences require completion of benchmark or gateway courses to progress in the majors.

To begin the process of changing to, or adding a major in, the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences:

  1. Visit the department of your major to discuss the major requirements with a department advisor and to obtain the change/addition of major form or LEP application.
  2. Register for an academic planning workshop, by going to the BSOS Workshops website.
  3. Submit your academic plan and change/addition of major form to the Advising Center.
  4. Once your plan is reviewed and approved, your major will be changed/added. You can find out the approximate review time for plans/major changes when you submit your paperwork.

Majors:

  • African American Studies - AASD
  • Anthropology - ANTH
  • Criminology and Criminal Justice (LEP) - CCJS
  • Economics - ECON
  • Environmental Science and Policy - ENSP
  • Geographical Sciences  - GEOG
  • Geographic Information Science and Computer Cartography - GIS
  • Government and Politics (LEP) - GVPT
  • Hearing and Speech Sciences - HESP
  • Psychology (LEP) - PSYC
  • Sociology - SOCY

African American Studies (AASD)

The African American Studies Department offers a bachelor of arts degree with two highly-regarded options: a cultural and social analysis concentration with emphasis on culture and history; or the public policy concentration with an emphasis on problem-solving, analytical decision-making and practical applications of policy analysis and management skills. In addition, students who elect majors in other departments can earn a certificate in African American studies. In September 2004, we introduced a minor in black women's studies which is a collaborative program with the university's Department of Women's Studies. 

Anthropology B.A. (ANTH)

Anthropology, the study of culture, seeks to understand humans as a whole -- as social beings who are capable of symbolic communication through which they produce a rich cultural record. Anthropologists try to explain differences among cultures -- differences in physical characteristics as well as in customary behavior. Anthropologists study how culture has changed through time as the human genus has spread over the earth. Anthropology is the science of the biological evolution of human species, and the disciplined scholarship of the cultural development of human beings' knowledge and customary behavior. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree provides a strong foundation with bases in all the subfields of anthropology. 

Anthropology B.S. (ANTH)

Anthropology, the study of culture, seeks to understand humans as a whole -- as social beings who are capable of symbolic communication through which they produce a rich cultural record. Anthropologists try to explain differences among cultures -- differences in physical characteristics as well as in customary behavior. Anthropologists study how culture has changed through time as the human genus has spread over the earth. Anthropology is the science of the biological evolution of human species, and the disciplined scholarship of the cultural development of human beings' knowledge and customary behavior. 

The Bachelor of Science degree provides an opportunity to match quantitative and laboratory skills with a focus in archaeology, ecological anthropology, or medical anthropology.

Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJS)

The mission of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology is to provide a supportive academic and professional environment for faculty and students. The department promotes study and teaching concerning crime and delinquency and their prevention and control. The University of Maryland's Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice is a national and international leader in research and criminal justice education, and its graduate program is ranked number one in the field. Courses offered by this department may be found under the following acronym: CCJS. 

Gen Ed Program

  • For current students who matriculated prior to Fall 2015, or transfer students from University System of Maryland and Maryland community colleges, declaring major prior to Fall 2017.

Major Card & Sample Plan

  • For students enrolled as freshmen in Fall 2015 or later, or new transfer students outside of the University System of Maryland and Maryland community colleges.

Major Card & Sample Plan 

Economics B.A. (ECON)

Economists study a wide range of phenomena using analytical methods that describe how people and collections of people behave and interact. Many economists define their profession as the analysis of decisions made in the context of scarcity. Economics can also be described as the study of the production, pricing and distribution of goods and services within societies. Economists study such problems as inflation, unemployment, poverty, environmental quality, financial markets and international trade. Economists also apply their methods of analysis to such diverse areas as crime, health care, discrimination and the problems of developing countries. 

The old Bachelor of Arts (BA) requirements allow students to choose between 400-level ECON courses that examine real world issues and those that focus on developing expertise in economic methodology. The new Bachelor of Arts (BA) requirements emphasize breadth of exposure to different topics in economics.

Economics B.S. (ECON)

Economists study a wide range of phenomena using analytical methods that describe how people and collections of people behave and interact. Many economists define their profession as the analysis of decisions made in the context of scarcity. Economics can also be described as the study of the production, pricing and distribution of goods and services within societies. Economists study such problems as inflation, unemployment, poverty, environmental quality, financial markets and international trade. Economists also apply their methods of analysis to such diverse areas as crime, health care, discrimination and the problems of developing countries. 

 The Bachelor of Science (BS) emphasizes methodology and techniques of economic analysis. 

Environmental Science and Policy (ENSP)

Environmental Science and Policy is a broadly multidisciplinary, undergraduate major, drawing courses and faculty from 20 departments and four colleges (the Colleges of Agriculture and Natural Resources; Behavioral and Social Sciences; Chemical and Life Sciences; and Computer, Mathematical, and Physical Sciences). 

Geographical Sciences (GEOG)

How do you see the future? More of everything: food, parks, leisure, personal electronic devices, peace between the nations? Or more people, new diseases, traffic gridlock, and starvation? Will there still be crabs and oysters from the Chesapeake Bay? 

Geographic Information Science and Computer Cartography (GIS)

The Geography Department offers an important area of specialization: GIS (geographic information systems) and Computer Cartography. The Bachelor of Science degree program in Geographic Information Science and Computer Cartography is designed to give students the technical skills needed to acquire, manage and analyze very large amounts of geographic data. Students will get extensive computer training in digital processing of remote sensing observations and cartographic vector data, spatial analysis, and the display of information products. Almost everything we do involves geographic information, from deciding where to live and travel, to environmental monitoring and urban planning. Influenced by computer technology, the academic disciplines of geographic information science such as remote sensing, (GIS) and computer cartography have evolved dramatically in the past few decades. Remote sensing is the science of obtaining geographic information from aircraft and satellites. GIS technology manages and analyzes different forms of digital geographic data, and this field has been growing at an extraordinary rate. Computer cartography has revolutionized traditional cartography to vastly improve map making and visualization of geographic information in a multimedia environment. 

Government and Politics (GVPT)

Government and politics is one of the largest majors on campus with approximately 1,000 students taking courses in American politics, international relations, comparative politics, political theory, political philosophy, law, public policy and environmental policy. Its large and diverse group of students are mentored by faculty through a variety of in- and out-of -classroom experiences and have been extremely successful in garnering campus and national awards, acceptance to competitive law and graduate programs, and exciting careers in all levels of government and the private sector. Students also benefit from a large and active group of local alumni who have reached the highest levels of their respective careers and who actively meet, recruit, and mentor current students. 

  • GVPT website
  • Location: 3104 Tydings Hall
  • Phone: 301-405-4124 or 301-405-4142

Government and Politics - International Relations Concentration (GVPT)

The Department of Government and Politics offers an exciting array of international politics courses, taught by leading scholars of international and comparative politics. Studying international relations at Maryland means exploring the politics and political economy of cross-border interactions, including the determinants of foreign policy behavior.Students in the International Relations concentration will learn about topics such as the causes of war, the workings of international organizations, the complexities of international negotiations, and the politics of foreign economic policy and economic development.  They will also have the opportunity to study the international relations of particular countries (such as China) or regions (such as the Middle East).  And because international and domestic politics are closely related, students will learn as well about comparative politics, and will have the opportunity to enroll in classes that explore the politics and political institutions of different countries and regions. 

  • GVPT website
  • Location: 3104 Tydings Hall
  • Phone: 301-405-4124 or 301-405-4142

Hearing and Speech Sciences (HESP)

Hearing and speech sciences is an inherently interdisciplinary field, integrating knowledge from the physical and biological sciences, medicine, psychology, linguistics and education in order to understand human communication and its disorders. The department curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. An undergraduate major in this field is an appropriate background for graduate training in speech-language pathology or audiology, as well as for graduate work in other disciplines requiring knowledge of normal or disordered speech, language or hearing. The student who wishes to work professionally as a speech-language pathologist or audiologist must obtain a graduate degree in order to meet national certification requirements and most state licensure laws. 

Psychology (PSYC)

The undergraduate major in psychology provides an introduction to the methods by which the behavior of humans and other organisms are studied, and to the biological conditions and social factors that influence behavior. 

  • PSYC website
  • Location: 1121 Biology-Psychology Building
  • Phone: 301-405-5866

Sociology (SOCY)

Sociology is the scientific study of society and its institutions, organizations, and groups. By observing the broad range of activities in society, and exploring topics such as social class, race, gender, deviance, family, religion, the work place, and demographic trends, sociologists provide important information and perspectives on our social order and the causes and impacts of social change. Sociology provides important information useful both to personal life and public policy decisions. Sociology is among the broadest of the social sciences and is characterized by considerable pluralism in theoretical and methodological approaches, substantive specializations, and in units of analysis. 

  • SOCY website
  • Location: 2108 Parren Mitchell Art/Sociology Building
  • Phone: 301-405-6389

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