Baf3m Assignments Clip

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1 Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.1 REVIEW QUESTIONS (text p. 307) The Adjustment Process Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

2 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.1 EXERCISES (text p. 308) Exercise 1, p. 308 Complete the following schedule. Trial Balance Supplies Closing Supplies Expense Supplies Figure Inventory Figure Figure 1. $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Trial Balance Prepaid Insurance Insurance Expense Prepaid Insurance Figure Final Calculation Figure 1. $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Exercise 2, p. 308 GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 219

3 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.1 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 3, p. 308 Using the following information, complete the inventory sheet and make the adjusting entry in the T-accounts. Inventory Item Quantity Unit Price Value Rubber bands 3 boxes $ 1.50 per box Envelopes #8 10 boxes per box Envelopes #10 4 1/2 boxes per box Envelopes, manila 2 boxes per box Printer cartridges 2 boxes per box Letterhead 10M sheets per M Copy paper 4M sheets per M File folders 2 boxes 6.00 per box Paper clips 12 boxes 1.50 per box Staples 15 boxes 4.10 per box Pencils, regular 4 doz per doz. Pencils, red 2 doz per doz. Total Supplies Supplies Expense Exercise 4, p. 309 Year Insurance Expense Prepaid Insurance (Dec. 31) Total Expense $ Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

4 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.1 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 5, p. 309 A. a. b. c. d. e. f. Total number of months Total number of months of insurance used as of of insurance unused as of Value of the prepaid insurance at the the designated year-end the designated year-end designated year-end B. GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 221

5 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.1 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 6, p. 309 Prepaid Licences Truck Licence Expense Bank ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 REVIEW QUESTIONS (text p. 319) Adjusting Entries and the Work Sheet Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

6 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (text p. 320) Exercise 1, p. 320 A. P. Tang and Company WORK SHEET Year Ended December 31, 20-4 ACCOUNTS TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Automobile Accounts Payable P. Tang, Capital P. Tang, Drawings Fees Earned Car Expense General Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Wages Expense Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 223

7 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) B. GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT 20-4 C. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Automoblie Accounts Payable P. Tang, Capital P. Tang, Drawings (Ledger continues on next page.) 224 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

8 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) C. (cont.) Fees Earned Car Expense General Expense P. Tang and Company Adjusted Trial Balance December 31, 20-4 Miscellaneous Expense 700 ACCOUNTS DEBIT CREDIT Rent Expense Wages Expense Supplies Expense Insurance Expense Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 225

9 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Optional D. P. Tang and Company Income Statement Year Ended December 31, Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

10 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Optional D. (cont.) P. Tang and Company Balance Sheet December 31, 20-4 Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 227

11 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2, p. 320 A. Mission Marketing WORK SHEET Year Ended December 31, 20-3 ACCOUNTS TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Automobile Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable C. Ans, Capital C. Ans, Drawings Fees Earned Car Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

12 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) B. GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT C. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Automobile Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable C. Ans, Capital C. Ans, Drawings Fees Earned (Ledger continues on next page.) Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 229

13 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) C. (cont.) Car Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Mission Marketing Adjusted Trial Balance December 31, 20-3 Utilities Expense ACCOUNTS DEBIT CREDIT Wages Expense Supplies Expense Insurance Expense 230 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

14 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) Optional D. Mission Marketing Income Statement Year Ended December 31, 20-3 Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 231

15 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.2 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) Optional D. (cont.) Mission Marketing Balance Sheet December 31, Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

16 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.3 REVIEW QUESTIONS (text p. 324) Closing Entries Concepts ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.3 EXERCISES (text p. 324) Exercise 1, p. 324 Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 233

17 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.3 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2, p. 325 A., B. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Bank Loan S. Mosar, Capital S. Mosar, Drawings Accounts Receivable Accounts Payable Advertising Revenue Sales Revenue Miscellaneous Supplies Bank Charges Expense Equipment Printing Expense Rent Expense Telephone Expense Utilities Expense Wage Expense Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

18 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.3 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 3, p. 325 (Workbook Exercise) In the chart below, the steps in the accounting cycle are given in incorrect order. Required: 1. In the column headed Step No., enter the correct step number according to the sequence of steps given in the text on page In two of the remaining five columns, place check marks to indicate when the step is performed and by whom. Done at the Done by Done by Steps in the Step Done Done End of the Junior Senior Accounting Cycle No. Daily Monthly Fiscal Period Personnel Personnel Journal entries posted to the ledger accounts. Adjusting and closing entries journalized and posted. Post-closing trial balance. Financial statements prepared. Ledger balanced by means of a trial balance. Accounting entries recorded in the journal. Work sheet prepared. Transactions occur. Exercise 4, p. 326 A. Accounting is in nature. B. The states that financial reporting is done in equal periods of time. C. Asset and liability accounts are considered to be accounts. D. have their balances continue on into the succeeding fiscal period. E. Revenue, expense, and drawings accounts are considered to be accounts. F. The balances in do not continue into the fiscal period. G. Another name for a nominal account is a. H. Nominal accounts begin each fiscal period with. I. The process of removing the old balances from the nominal accounts is known as. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 235

19 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.3 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) J. means to cause it to have no balance. K. During a fiscal period, the Capital account shows. L. Changes in equity during a fiscal period (except for additional investments by the owner) are contained in accounts. M. At the end of the fiscal period, the ledger is brought up to date by. N. One of the final steps in the accounting cycle is to bring the Capital account and to the nominal accounts. O. The final step in the accounting cycle is. ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.4 REVIEW QUESTIONS (text p. 334) Journalizing and Posting the Closing Entries Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

20 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.4 EXERCISES (text p. 334) Exercise 1, p. 334 GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 237

21 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.4 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2, p. 335 A. B. GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT 238 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

22 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.4 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) C. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable R. Tompko, Capital R. Tompko, Drawings Revenue Advertising Expense Bank Charges Expense Supplies Used Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense Insurance Expense Income Summary Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 239

23 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.4 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) D. Golden Tresses Hair Stylists Post-Closing Trial Balance December 31, 20 Exercise 3, p. 335 Indicate whether each of the following statements is true or false by placing a T or an F in the space indicated. Explain the reason for each F response. a. Journalizing and posting the adjusting and closing entries is a routine task that can be done by any knowledgeable accounting clerk. b. All of the data required to journalize the adjusting and closing entries can be found on the work sheet. c. It can be assumed that all adjustments have been thought of once the work sheet is completed. d. The adjusting entries must be journalized and posted to bring the ledger into agreement with the figures on the financial statements. e. An explanation is needed for each individual adjusting entry being journalized. f. The adjusting and closing entries in the journal are dated as of the end of the fiscal period. g. The closing entries can be processed only by using the four-step method. h. The figures for the first closing entry are taken from the income statement section, debit column, of the work sheet. i. Because revenue accounts have debit balances, credit entries are needed to close them out. j. The second closing entry transfers the balances in the expense accounts to the Income Summary account. k. When the adjusting entries and the first two closing entries are journalized and posted, all but three of the accounts in the equity section of the ledger will have nil balances. 240 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

24 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.4 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 3 (cont.) l. A loss has occurred if the Income Summary account has a credit balance before it is closed out. m. The first two entries in the Income Summary account are the same as the subtotals of the income statement section of the work sheet. n. The Income Summary account is not closed out if a loss occurs. Explanations for F Responses ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 REVIEW QUESTIONS (text p. 348) Adjusting for Depreciation Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 241

25 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 REVIEW QUESTIONS (cont.) ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (text p. 348) Exercise 1, p. 348 For each of the following situations, allocate the total cost to the proper fiscal periods. Assume the company commenced business on January 1, 20-1, and has a fiscal year-end of December A truck was purchased on January 1, 20-1, for $ It was expected to last for five full years, at the end of which it would have a trade-in value of $ Use the straight-line method of depreciation A used vehicle was bought on November 1, 20-1, for $ It was expected to last for four full years, at the end of which it would have a resale value of $ Use the straight-line method of depreciation Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

26 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) 3. A building was purchased on May 1, 20-2, for the sum of $ It was expected to last for 25 years, at which time it would have a resale value of $ Use the straight-line method of depreciation A new machine was bought on January 1, 20-1, for $ It is depreciated using the decliningbalance method at the rate of 20 per cent A new building was bought on July 1, 20-1, for $ It is depreciated using the decliningbalance method at a rate of 5 per cent Exercise 2, p. 349 A. Straight-line Depreciation Year Depreciation Balance Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 243

27 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) B. Declining-balance Depreciation Year Depreciation Balance C. Exercise 3, p. 349 A Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

28 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 3 (cont.) B. $ Net Income Comparison $ $ $ $ $ $(5 000) C. Exercise 4, p. 350 The simplified general ledger of Shahid Company at the end of its annual fiscal period appears below. A. Using the additional information that is provided, record the year-end adjusting entries directly in the T-accounts. B. Prepare an adjusted trial balance. A. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies (Ledger continues on next page.) Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 245

29 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) Prepaid Insurance Land Buildings Accum. Depr. Buildings Equipment Accum. Depr. Equipment Accounts Payable J. Salk, Capital J. Salk, Drawings Revenue Bank Charges Expense Delivery Expense Miscellaneous Expense Telephone Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense Supplies Expense Insurance Expense Depreciation Exp. Buildings Depreciation Exp. Equipment Additional Information 1. Inventory of supplies at the year-end is $ Unexpired insurance at the year-end is $ Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis. The building is expected to last 40 years, at which time it will be worth $ The equipment is expected to last 15 years, after which it will be worth $ Ignore the 50% rule. 246 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

30 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) B. Shahid Company Adjusted Trial Balance date ACCOUNTS DEBIT CREDIT Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 247

31 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 5, p. 351 Vieira Associates WORK SHEET Year Ended December 31, 20 ACCOUNTS TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Accum. Depr. Equipment Automobiles Accum. Depr. Automobiles Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable C. Vieira, Capital C. Vieira, Drawings Consulting Fees Automobile Expense General Expense Rent Expense Telephone Expense Wages Expense Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

32 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 6, p. 351 GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Exercise 7, p. 351 Workbook Exercise Calculating Depreciation with the 50% Rule in Effect If you ever find yourself in a position where you have to prepare income tax forms for a business, you could very well find the process confusing when it comes to dealing with depreciation. This exercise is designed to give you some experience in this respect. Suppose that your business had the following accounts on December 31, 2001, the end of its first year of business. Dr Cr Buildings $ Accumulated Depreciation Buildings $6 000 Automobile $ Accumulated Depreciation Automobile $9 300 Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (the tax department) would view these accounts simply as: Buildings Class 3 Undepreciated Capital Cost $ Automobiles Class 10 Undepreciated Capital Cost $ Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 249

33 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 7 (cont.) Workbook Exercise A. When it came time to prepare income tax returns for the second year of business, you would have to include a tax form for calculating capital cost allowances (depreciation). This form would be prepared as shown below. There were no acquisitions or disposals of equipment during the year. 1 Class number 2 Undepreciated capital cost at the beginning of the year 3 Cost of acquisitions during the year (new property must be available for use) 4 Adjustments (show negative amounts in brackets) 5 Proceeds of dispositions during the year (amount not to exceed the capital cost) 6 Undepreclated capital cost (column 2 plus column 3 plus or minus column 4 minus column 5) 7 50% rule (deduct 1/2 of the amount, if any, by which the net cost of acquisitions exceeds column 5) 8 Reduced undepreciated capital cost (column 6 minus column 7) 9 CCA rate % 10 Capital cost allowance (column 8 multiplied by column 9; or a lower amount) 11 Undepreciate d capital cost at the end of the year (column 6 minus column 10) 3 $ $ $ % $11700 $ $ $ $ % $15810 $36890 Total $27510 Required 1. Assuming that the business uses the above methods for calculating depreciation, make entries in the ledger accounts on pages 251 and 252 to bring the Accumulated Depreciation accounts up to date. Use the Particulars column to briefly explain each entry. B. In the third year of operation, the business traded in its 1999 BMW automobile and purchased a new one. The automobile dealership agreed to a trade-in value for the old BMW of $36 890, which was the book value shown in company accounts. The cost of the new BMW was $75 000, meaning the business had to pay $ to complete the sale. The accounting entries to record the above transactions are given for you, as follows: Dr Cr Automobile Accounts Payable Purchased a new car Accounts Payable Accumulated Depreciation Automobile Automobile Traded in old car Accounts Payable Bank Paid balance on new car 250 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

34 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 7 (cont.) Required Workbook Exercise 2. Post the above transactions in the accounts provided. Use the Particulars column to briefly explain each entry. 3. Show the calculation used to determine the book value of the 1999 BMW. 4. On page 252, complete the capital cost allowance form for the third business year. Note that in the third year, columns 3, 5, and 7 are used. Be careful to read the column headings carefully as you proceed. 5. Identify the column of the CCA form where the 50% rule affects your calculations. 6. In the ledger, bring the Accumulated Depreciation accounts up to date. Use the Particulars column to briefly explain each entry. Use the capital cost allowance figures from the CCA form. 7. From the accounts, calculate the net book values of the fixed assets and see that they agree with the undepreciated capital cost figures, column 11 on the tax form. ACCOUNT Bank No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE ACCOUNT Building No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE 2001 First year purchase DR ACCOUNT Accumulated Depreciation Building No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE 2001 Depr. Year 1 (50% rule) CR Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 251

35 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 7 (cont.) Workbook Exercise ACCOUNT Automobile No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE 2001 First year purchase DR ACCOUNT Accumulated Depreciation Automobile No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE 2001 Depr. Year 1 (50% rule) CR ACCOUNT Accounts Payable No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE 1 Class number 2 Undepreciated capital cost at the beginning of the year 3 Cost of acquisitions during the year (new property must be available for use) 4 Adjustments (show negative amounts in brackets) 5 Proceeds of dispositions during the year (amount not to exceed the capital cost) 6 Undepreclated capital cost (column 2 plus column 3 plus or minus column 4 minus column 5) 7 50% rule (deduct 1/2 of the amount, if any, by which the net cost of acquisitions exceeds column 5) 8 Reduced undepreciated capital cost (column 6 minus column 7) 9 CCA rate % 10 Capital cost allowance (column 8 multiplied by column 9; or a lower amount) 11 Undepreciated capital cost at the end of the year (column 6 minus column 10) Total 252 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

36 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.5 EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 7 (cont.) Workbook Exercise ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9.6 COMPUTER REVIEW QUESTIONS (text p. 355) Adjusting and Closing Accounts with Simply Accounting Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 253

37 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (text p. 355) Exercise 1, p Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

38 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (text p. 355) Exercise 2, p. 355 Spreadsheet Exercise Challenge Exercise Load the model named ANDREWS and enter May s trial balance figures, which are shown in Figure 1 below. FIGURE 1 The trial balance of Andrews Landscaping for May Change the heading at G2 to read Three Months Ended May 31, 20. Save your work frequently. The owner of the business, Olivia Andrews, is concerned that the profits are not high enough. She wants an updated net income figure for the first quarter of the year. Therefore, adjustments to account balances will have to be made in order to calculate the most accurate net income possible. To insert the two columns needed for adjustments, move the cell pointer to column F and perform the insert commands of your spreadsheet. Type column headings, then enter SUM functions at F26 and G26. Your revised spreadsheet model should look like the partial one shown in Figure 2 on the next page. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 255

39 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) FIGURE 2 The work sheet with columns inserted for adjustments Entering Adjustments The following adjustments will affect the account balances of Andrews Landscaping: 1. A count revealed $ of Supplies on hand. 2. An invoice for equipment purchased on May 29 was not received until early June. The equipment cost $ and the GST paid was $63.88, for a total invoice amount of $ A 12-month insurance policy for $1 485 was bought on March 1. The entire amount was debited to Insurance Expense at that time. The owner wants the balance of this account reduced so it will reflect only the amount of insurance expired in the last three months. Enter the adjustments in columns F and G of your spreadsheet model. Because rows may be inserted in a spreadsheet, new accounts can be listed in numerical order instead of beneath the other trial balance accounts. Assign appropriate account numbers for any new accounts you create. 256 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

40 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) Extending the Work Sheet If you recorded the adjustments correctly, the totals in columns F and G should be $ You should have added two additional accounts: Supplies Expense and Prepaid Insurance. If you did not obtain these totals or enter these accounts, ask you teacher for assistance before continuing. Notice that, although you made the adjustment, the balances in the Income Statement and Balance Sheet columns are unchanged. The formulas in these cells must be modified so that they respond to the new figures in the Adjustments columns. Move the cell pointer to J6, the Bank amount in the balance sheet section. This cell contains a cell reference (D6). In order for J6 to respond to any future changes in the Adjustments columns, a formula will have to be entered. At J6, type D6 F6 G6. This instruction will add debits and subtract credits on the work sheet. When this formula is entered, no change occurs in the Bank account balance because no adjustments were made. Copy the formula at J6 down to all the balance sheet accounts that have debit amounts. You must be careful when you extend accounts with credit balances. A slight change in the formula is needed. Move the cell pointer to K12 (Bank Loan). Enter E12 F12 G12. This will subtract debits and add credits. Use your copy commands to complete the balance sheet section. Finish extending the work sheet by entering formulas to transfer the income statement amounts. Your finished model should look similar to Figure 3 on the next page. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 257

41 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) FIGURE 3 The work sheet after adjustments are made and amounts are extended. Improving the Spreadsheet Model There are often ways to improve the performance of the spreadsheet models you are developing. For example, the model you developed for Andrews Landscaping allows you to complete work sheets and financial statements month after month with minimal effort. However, what if a net loss occurred? Could your model handle this situation without any further input on your part? You may remember that the major change to the work sheet brought about by a net loss is the placement of the balancing figure. If there is a net income, the balancing figure is placed in the outer two of the last four columns. Conversely, if there is a net loss, the balancing figure is placed in the inner two of the last four columns. The finely tuned spreadsheet model should be able to make a logical decision. It should be able to handle simple matters, such as, If there is a net income, show the amount here, or If there is a net loss, show the amount there. To accomplish this goal, we must use the IF function. 258 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

42 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) The IF Function The IF function is called a logical function because it can make simple decisions. The structure of the IF function is as follows: prefix FUNCTION NAME (Condition, True Response, False Response) The prefix, function name, and parentheses are new. Let us examine how the IF function would be used at cell H29 of the Andrews Landscaping work sheet. A logical statement for cell H29 could be expressed like this: If revenues are greater than expenses, calculate and show the net income. If revenues are not greater than expenses, show zero. The IF function dissected below will accomplish this logical IF(I28>H28,I28H28,0) the false response: zero the true response: calculate net income the condition: if revenues are greater than expenses the function prefix and name (Remember, prefixes vary.) Using the function prefix for your spreadsheet software, enter the above function at cell H29. When you press the Return key, you should notice no difference in your model because revenues are greater than expenses. Accordingly, the net income is calculated and shown in H29. To test the function, reduce the Fees Earned amount in cell E18 to $ Now revenues are not greater than expenses, so 0.00 is shown at H29. After testing, change the contents of E18 back to $ Now that you understand how IF functions work, you should see that one is also needed at cell I29, the location where net losses are shown. Enter the proper IF function at I29 and a cell reference at J29. Once again, test your model by changing Fees Earned at E18 to $ and back again. Figures 4 and 5 below allow you to check you work. FIGURE 4 The response of the IF function when there is a net income Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 259

43 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) FIGURE 5 The response of the IF function when there is a net loss You can change Net Income to Net Loss by typing a new label. However, some spreadsheet programs allow you to have labels as the true and false response of an IF function. An IF function that would work well at cell B29 0, Net Income, Net Loss ) Note that when you want the IF function to display labels, they usually must be typed inside quotation marks. You should now have some idea how useful the IF function can be. Accountants can be alerted to costs that are too high, sales projections that are too low, and many other kinds of management information by keying in IF functions at strategic points in their spreadsheets. Percentage Analysis Another way to improve this spreadsheet model is to have each expense shown on the income statement expressed as a percentage of total revenue. For Andrews Landscaping, this is accomplished by dividing each number by Fees Earned and expressing the answer in a per cent format. Refer to Figure 6 below for an example. To get your model to look like Figure 6, do the following: 1. Change the heading at M42 to Three Months Ended May 31, Move the cell pointer to P45 and insert a column. 3. Type the Per Cent heading at P You will remember that a new account was added to the work sheet: Supplies Expense. To have this account appear on the income statement, move the cell pointer M53 and insert a row. Then enter the account title and cell reference for its balance. (Make sure that this cell reference comes from column H.) Check your progress against Figure 6 to ensure that all expense account balances in column N match those in column H, from which they are derived. 260 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

44 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) FIGURE 6 In column P, each income statement figure is expressed as a percentage of Fees Earned. Copying with Absolute Cell References Move the cell pointer to P48. Expressing the Advertising amount as a percentage of Fees Earned is a simple matter. Divide cell N48 (Advertising) by O46 (Fees Earned) and apply a per cent format. Before using your copy commands, remember that cell references change when copied to new locations. In this case, you want the references to expense account balances to change, but not the reference to Fees Earned. You must convert the cell reference for Fees Earned into an absolute cell reference. An absolute cell reference is one that will not change when copied. At P48, the formula is N48/O46. To change O46 to an absolute cell reference, dollar signs are entered in front of the row and the column references. (Most spreadsheets have shortcut commands to do this. At the very least, the dollar signs can be typed.) At P48, enter N48/$O$46. Copy the new formula at P48 down to P56. To complete column P, also express Fees Earned, Total Expenses, and Net Income as percentages of Fees Earned. Computer Review Questions 1. Why is the IF function called a logical function? 2. Within the parentheses of an IF function, what three items are separated by commas? Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 261

45 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2 (cont.) 3. If labels are to be used as the true and false responses of an IF function, how must they be written? Give an example. 4. What are absolute cell references? 5. How would cell A62 be written as an absolute reference? Computer Exercises A. Update the balance sheet section of your spreadsheet model for Andrews Landscaping. You will have to put in a new date and make room for the Prepaid Insurance account. B. A late invoice for advertising was discovered. It was for radio time on May 29 and 30, so it should be included in May s work sheet and statements. The total invoice amount was $ , which included $1 445 for advertising and $ for GST. 1. Make the necessary changes in the adjustment columns of the work sheet (columns F and G). 2. The work sheet should balance automatically, but the financial statements will be wrong. Correct all references to net income or net loss on the income statement and the balance sheet. C. You need to make sure that the financial statements will automatically respond to all future situations (i.e., net income or net loss). To accomplish this goal, enter appropriate IF functions on the balance sheet. Pay particular attention to calculations of capital. Test your model under three conditions: net income greater than drawings, net income less than drawings, and net loss. (Note: To test your model, change Fees Earned and Bank by equal amounts in the trial balance section of the work sheet.) Note: page 269 follows next. 262 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

46 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) This page is left blank intentionally. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 263

47 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) This page is left blank intentionally. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 264

48 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) This page is left blank intentionally. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 265

49 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) This page is left blank intentionally. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 266

50 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) This page is left blank intentionally. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 267

51 ANSWERS TO SECTION 9.6 COMPUTER EXERCISES (cont.) This page is left blank intentionally. Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 268

52 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (text p. 356) Exercise 1, p. 356 A. B. Bank Prepaid Insurance Insurance Expense Exercise 2, p. 357 ACCOUNT Supplies No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE ACCOUNT Supplies Expense No. DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT DR/CR BALANCE Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 269

53 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (text p. 356) Exercise 3, p. 357 Prepaid Insurance Insurance Expense A. F. B. G. Insurance Expense C. Insurance Expense Prepaid Insurance Prepaid Insurance H. 1) National D. E. 1) 2) Regal 2) 3) Standard 3) Total Total 270 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

54 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4, p. 358 A. J. Soo and Associates WORK SHEET Year Ended December 31, 20-5 ACCOUNTS TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Automobile Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable J. Soo, Capital J. Soo, Drawings Commissions Car Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 271

55 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) B. GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT C. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Equipment Automobile Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable J. Soo, Capital J. Soo, Drawings Commissions (Ledger continues on next page.) 272 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

56 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) C. (cont.) Car Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense Supplies Expense Insurance Expense J. Soo & Associates Adjusted Trial Balance December 31, 20-5 Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 273

57 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) Optional D. J. Soo & Associates Income Statement Year Ended December 31, Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

58 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 4 (cont.) Optional D. (cont.) J. Soo & Associates Balance Sheet December 31, 20-5 Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 275

59 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 5, p. 359 Karen Millette, Real Estate WORK SHEET Year Ended September 30, 20-4 ACCOUNTS Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Prepaid Insurance Land Building Accum. Deprec. Building Furniture and Equipment Accum. Deprec. Furn. & Equip. Automotive Equipment Accum. Deprec. Auto Equipment Accounts Payable Bank Loan Karen Millette, Capital Karen Millette, Drawings Commissions Revenue Advertising Expense Bank Charges Car Expense Commissions Expense Miscellaneous Expense Postage Expense Telephone Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

60 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 6, p. 360 Tom s Plastering WORK SHEET Year Ended October 31, 20-1 ACCOUNTS Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies Small Tools Prepaid Insurance Equipment Accum. Deprec. Equipment Truck Accum. Deprec. Truck Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable Bank Loan Tom Michaud, Capital Tom Michaud, Drawings Revenue Bank Interest and Charges Materials Used Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Telephone Expense Truck Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT SWB Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 277

61 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 6 (cont.) Income Statement 278 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

62 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 6 (cont.) Balance Sheet Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 279

63 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1, p. 361 Comprehensive Exercise Oakville Journal WORK SHEET Year Ended December 31, 20-8 ACCOUNTS Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies and Materials Prepaid Insurance Land Buildings Accum. Dep. Buildings Equipment Accum. Dep. Equipment Automotive Equipment Accum. Dep. Auto. Equipment Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable Bank Loan Mortgage Payable R. Lucht, Capital R. Lucht, Drawings Revenue Advertising Revenue Circulation Bank Interest and Charges Bldg. Maintenance Expense Car Expense Miscellaneous Expense Mortgage Interest Expense Postage Expense Office Salaries Expense Sales Promotion Expense Telephone Expense Truck Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

64 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise B. Income Statement Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 281

65 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise B. (cont.) Balance Sheet 282 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

66 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise C. GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Adjusting Entries Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 283

67 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise C. (cont.) GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Closing Entries 284 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

68 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise D. GENERAL LEDGER Bank Accounts Receivable Supplies & Materials Prepaid Insurance Land Buildings Accum. Dep. Buildings Equipment Accum. Dep. Equipment Automotive Equipment Accum. Dep. Auto. Equip Accounts Payable GST Payable GST Recoverable Bank Loan Mortgage Payable R. Lucht, Capital R. Lucht, Drawings Revenue Advertising Revenue Circulation (Ledger continues on next page.) Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 285

69 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise D. (cont.) Bank Interest & Charges Building Maintenance Expense Car Expense Miscellaneous Expense Mortgage Interest Expense Office Salaries Expense Postage Expense Sales Promotion Expense Telephone Expense Truck Expense Utilities Expense Wages Expense Depreciation Depreciation Depreciation Expense Expense Buildings Expense Equipment Automotive Equipment Supplies and Materials Expense Insurance Expense Income Summary 286 Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

70 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 1 (cont.) Comprehensive Exercise E. Post-Closing Trial Balance ACCOUNTS DEBIT CREDIT Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 287

71 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Exercise 2, p. 362 Comprehensive Exercise GENERAL JOURNAL PAGE DATE PARTICULARS P.R. DEBIT CREDIT Questions for Further Thought, p Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

72 ANSWERS TO CHAPTER 9 REVIEW EXERCISES (cont.) Questions for Further Thought (cont.) CASE STUDIES (text p. 364) Case 1 A Balancing Act, p Case 2 A Mix-Up in Year-End Accounting, p Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 289

73 CASE STUDIES (cont.) Case 2 (cont.) Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

74 CASE STUDIES (cont.) Challenge Case 3 Can you Meet This Deadline?, p. 369 Stetsko and Company WORK SHEET Six Months Ended June 30, 20 ACCOUNTS TRIAL BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT DEBIT CREDIT Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 291

75 CASE STUDIES (cont.) Co-operative Learning Case 4 A Better Way of Depreciating a Truck?, p The comparative depreciation schedule is shown below: Distance Depreciation Depreciation Year Travelled Straight-line Km travelled Totals Accounting 1 Student Workbook Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario

76 Career DAVID YAN/BANK AND INVESTMENT TEAM MANAGER ANSWERS TO DISCUSSION QUESTIONS (text p. 371) Copyright 2002 Pearson Education Canada Inc., Toronto, Ontario Chapter 9 Completing the Accounting Cycle 293

Tom Card
B.Sc., B.Ed., OCT

Tom worked on developing the Ontario Science curriculum and has written a number of Science courses for the Independent Learning Centre. This is his first go at on-line teaching and he is very excited about being back in the classroom (virtual instead of one with walls) and interacting with students again. His greatest satisfaction comes from working with students, answering their questions, and supporting them as they learn about Science and their own learning styles.

Tom and his wife have moved away from the greater Toronto area into a little community where they are able to walk everywhere – to the grocery store, post office, bank, and library. They enjoy hiking on the local trails and touring the countryside, visiting the small towns in the area.

Tom likes to start each day with a 5 km run; he has competed in road races in the past and hopes to do so again. He and his wife have travelled to Italy, Austria, Germany, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Bosnia, Croatia and Slovenia since retiring. Their next trip will likely be to England, Scotland and Ireland. Tom also enjoys reading, both fiction and non-fiction.

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