Wsop Day 4 Seat Assignments

Make a World Series of Poker Day 2? Study Those Table Draws

Making Day 2 of a World Series of Poker bracelet event is exciting. You may have some troubling bagging and tagging your chips — I’ve seen many first-timers seal their bag without the slip inside — but if you listen to the dealer carefully, then you should be able to ace the exercise and go get some rest.

Rest is important. Your restart is likely to be in only 11-12 hours, and you want to make sure you get a good night’s sleep. If you’re hungry, then you should grab a quick bite, but try to avoid greasy foods because they can leave you feeling bloated or dissatisfied in the morning. You need nutrients after a long grind, not fatty acids.

A proper sleep will allow you to wake up and grab some breakfast, the most important meal in the day. It will also give you time to study your seat draw.

At the WSOP, Caesars employs a hard-working group of interns who pump out seat draws for every event, every day, posting them under the “Reports” tab for each event on WSOP.com. Posting seat draws online can also save the players some time, letting them know where they’re supposed to go before they arrive at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino.

There is very little direct preparation in poker, particularly in tournaments because we don’t always know against whom we are going to compete. On a Day 1, you’ll sit with a randomly drawn group of individuals, and players will come and go as the day progresses. However, at the start of subsequent days, you know the seven or eight players you are going to sit with ahead of time, and doing a little research can help you in certain spots.

For example, most $1,500 buy-in bracelet events burst the money bubble at the start of Day 2. If you have an average stack and you are anticipating an opportunity to abuse the bubble, you might want to make sure you are playing hands against opponents that will let you get away with aggressive play.

If your table features professional players — that is, players who are looking to finish in the top nine rather than the top 200 — then they are likely to play back at you. Conversely, if none of the players at your table have a profile on Hendon Mob, then maybe they are going to try and fold until the money to secure their first cash.

Researching your upcoming opponents can also provide you with pivotal information that will assist you in certain hands. Such is a lesson even seasoned players are sometimes still learning.

For example, during the 2014 PokerStars Caribbean Adventure, 2012 WSOP Main Event champ Greg Mersontold us a story on the PokerNews Podcast about about how he made a mistake prior to Day 5 of the 2013 WSOP Main Event by not asking his friends about Brett Richey, the player who would be sitting on his right to start that day of play.

Merson knew Richey was a pro — after all, his Hendon Mob profile is impressive, and he’s received plenty of airtime on ESPN. But Merson mistakenly thought he was your standard, aggressive young player. Richey also tends to act very quickly at the table, further giving him an aggressive vibe, which encouraged Merson to three-bet shove a little lighter than usual against him because he thought that Richey’s opening range was wide.

Unfortunately for Merson, he was wrong. (That pic above shows Merson shaking Richey's hand after having been eliminated by him.)

“All I had to do was ask someone,” Merson lamented.

Even if the names of your upcoming opponents are unfamiliar to you, throw them into a Google search along with the words “poker” or “hendon mob.” Maybe you’ll unearth a hand history with the player on PokerNews, or perhaps they’ve even played at a televised table that you can watch. Poker is a game of incomplete information, and the more information you attain, the better off you will be.

Don’t let the influx of information make you go crazy, though. There will be situations where even the most detailed preparation will take a back seat to your poker knowledge and instincts, and you make develop a read on a player that differentiates from what other people have told you.

Use the information available to increase your chances of forcing your opponents to make mistakes, but don’t lean on it and ultimately use it as an excuse for why you hit the rail.

Get all the latest PokerNews updates on your social media outlets. Follow us on Twitter and find us on both Facebook and Google+!

How does a trip to Las Vegas in the middle of July sound? If you're sane it probably doesn't sound that great at all. After all, with 110 degree Fahrenheit heat hitting your face on a good day, the desert is probably the last place you'd want to be. In fact, Alaska probably sounds a lot better.

Unless, of course, you're a poker player, in which case the middle of the Nevada desert is an absolute oasis.

Your Guide to the 2018 World Series of Poker

The 2018 WSOP - Schedule of Tournaments, Buy-in & Satellite Information

Shuffle Up and Deal!

Welcome to the 2018 World Series of Poker - the biggest, richest poker event that attracts poker pros, celebrities, and amateur poker players from every corner of the globe is back for 2018. For more than 40 days from May to July, the best of the best (and the worst, too) descend on Sin City for the ultimate roller coaster ride of their poker lives. Only one player gets to leave with the title of WSOP 2018 Main Event Champion but the big question is, who will it be this year?

If you're a hardcore poker player, you'll be there from Day 1, playing the smaller events and some of the high-roller events, too. If you're a focused player who happens to have another day job, you might prefer to play exclusively in the Main Event. Maybe it's your first time going to the World Series or even to Las Vegas (check out our extensive Las Vegas Guide for where to stay and what to do). Whatever style of poker player you are, the World Series of Poker is built for you.

But before you dive into the World Series of Poker 2018 head first, you should probably know what you're up against, how other players have made out, the schedule of events and even how to win your way into the event for just a few bucks. Our 2018 WSOP guide has everything you need to know, so read on.

The 2018 World Series of Poker Schedule

Remember, there's more to the world's biggest poker series than just the Main Event. Our WSOP 2018 schedule below has every event for 2018 and all the important information you need to know about.

The 2018 WSOP schedule has not yet been released. However, as soon as it is announced we'll post the schedule of events right here.

2018 WSOP events

Event #

Event Title

Event Date

Duration

Buy-in

Event #Event TitleEvent DateDurationBuy-in

1

Casino Employees NL Hold'emWed, May 30th, 11:00 AM2 Days$565

2

NL Hold'em Super Turbo BountyWed, May 30th, 3:00 PM1 Day$10,000

3

No-Limit Hold'em SHOOTOUTThurs, May 31st, 11:00 AM3 Days$3,000

4

Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or BetterThurs, May 31st, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

5

NL Hold'em High RollerFri, June 1st, 3:00 PM4 Days$100,000

6

GIANT - No-Limit Hold'emFri, June 1st, 7:00 PM31 Days$365

6B

GIANT - No-Limit Hold'emFri, June 8th, 7:00 PM24 Days$365

6C

GIANT - No-Limit Hold'emFri, June 15th, 7:00 PM17 Days$365

6D

GIANT - No-Limit Hold'emFri, June 22nd, 7:00 PM10 Days$365

6E

GIANT - No-Limit Hold'emFri, June 29th, 7:00 PM3 Days$365

7

COLOSSUSSat, June 2nd, 10:00 AM6 Days$565

7B

COLOSSUSSat, June 2nd, 5:00 PM6 Days$565

7C

COLOSSUSSun, June 3rd, 10:00 AM5 Days$565

7D

COLOSSUSSun, June 3rd, 5:00 PM5 Days$565

7E

COLOSSUSMon, June 4th, 10:00 AM4 Days$565

7F

COLOSSUSMon, June 4th, 5:00 PM4 Days$565

8

Mixed Triple Draw LowballSat, June 2nd, 3:00 PM3 Days$2,500

9

WSOP.com ONLINE No-Limit Hold'emSun, June 3rd, 3:30 PM1 Day$365

10

Omaha Hi-Lo 8 or Better ChampionshipSun, June 3rd, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

11

PLO GIANTSun, June 3rd, 7:00 PM31 Days$365

11B

PLO GIANTSun, June 10th, 7:00 PM24 Days$365

11C

PLO GIANTSun, June 17th, 7:00 PM17 Days$365

11D

PLO GIANTSun, June 24th, 7:00 PM10 Days$365

11E

PLO GIANTSun, July 1st, 7:00 PM3 Days$365

12

Dealer's Choice 6-HandedMon, June 4th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

13

No-Limit Hold'emTues, June 5th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

14

No-Limit 2-7 Lowball DrawTues, June 5th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

15

H.O.R.S.E.Wed, June 6th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

15

Heads Up No-Limit Hold'em Championship

512 Players Max

Wed, June 6th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

17

No-Limit Hold'em 6-HandedThurs, June 7th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

18

Dealers Choice 6-Handed ChampionshipThurs, June 7th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

19

Pot-Limit Omaha

Unlimited Re-entry

Fri, June 8th, 10:00 AM3 Days$565

19B

Pot-Limit Omaha

Unlimited Re-entry

Fri, June 8th, 5:00 PM3 Days$565

20

No-Limit Hold'emFri, June 8th, 3:00 PM4 Days$5,000

21

MILLIONAIRE MAKER No-Limit Hold'em

$1,000,000 Guaranteed for 1st Place

Sat, June 9th, 10:00 AM6 Days$1,500

21B

MILLIONAIRE MAKER No-Limit Hold'em

$1,000,000 Guaranteed for 1st Place

Sun, June 10th, 10:00 AM5 Days$1,500

22

Eight Game MixSat, June 9th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

23

No-Limit 2-7 Lowball Draw ChampionshipSun, June 10th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

24

THE MARATHON - No-Limit Hold'em

26,200 Starting Chips

Mon, June 11th, 11:00 AM5 Days$2,620

25

7 Stud Hi-Lo 8 or BetterMon, June 11th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

26

Pot-Limit OmahaTues, June 12th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,000

27

H.O.R.S.E. ChampionshipTues, June 12th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

28

No-Limit Hold'em 6-HandedWed, June 13th, 11:00 AM3 Days$3,000

29

Limit 2-7 Lowball Triple DrawWed, June 13th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

30

Pot-Limit OmahaThurs, June 14th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

31

7 Card StudThurs, June 14th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

32

SENIORS No-Limit Hold'em Championship

Must be 50 years of age or older

Fri, June 15th, 10:00 AM3 Days$1,000

33

Poker Players ChampionshipFri, June 15th, 3:00 PM5 Days$50,000

34

Double Stack NL Hold'em

10,000 starting chips. 60 min levels

Sat, June 16th, 11:00 AM6 Days$1,000

34B

Double Stack NL Hold'em

10,000 starting chips. 60 min levels

Sun, June 17th, 11:00 AM5 Days$1,000

35

Mixed PLO, Omaha Hi-Lo, Omaha HL8, Big OSat, June 16th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

36

SUPER SENIORS No-Limit Hold'em

Must be 60 years of age or older

Sun, June 17th, 10:00 AM3 Days$1,000

37

No-Limit Hold'emMon, June 18th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

38

7 Card Stud ChampionshipMon, June 18th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

39

No Limit Hold'em ShootoutTues, June 19th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

40

Mixed Big Bet

No-Limit Hold'em, PLO, 2-7 NL Lowball, NL 5 Card Draw, Big O, PLO Hi-Lo, 2-7 PL Triple Draw

Tues, June 19th, 3:00 PM3 Days$2,500

41

Limit Hold'emWed, June 20th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

42

PLO 8-Handed High Roller

One re-entry

Wed, June 20th, 3:00 PM3 Days$25,000

43

No-Limit Hold'emThur, June 21st, 11:00 AM3 Days$2,500

44

Limit 2-7 Triple Draw ChampionshipThurs, June 21st, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

45

No Limit Hold'em

30 minute levels

Fri, June 22nd, 11:00 AM2 Days$1,000

46

Mixed Omaha Hi-Lo 8B / 7 Stud Hi-Lo 8BFri, June 22nd, 3:00 PM3 Days$2,500

47

WSOP.com Online PLO

6 handed - unlimited re-entry

Fri, June 22nd, 3:30 PM1 Day$565

48

NL Hold'em Monster StackSat, June 23rd, 10:00 AM5 Days$1,500

48B

NL Hold'em Monster StackSun, June 24th, 10:00 AM4 Days$1,500

49

Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Handed ChampionshipSat, June 23rd, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

50

RAZZSun, June 24th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

51

NL Hold'em Bounty

$500 bounties

Mon, June 25th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

52

Limit Hold'em ChampionshipMon, June 25th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

53

PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better

One re-entry

Tues, June 26th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

54

No Limit Hold'emTues, June 26th, 3:00 PM3 Days$3,000

55

Tag Team No Limit Hold'emWed, June 27th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,000

56

RAZZ ChampionshipWed, June 27th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

57

Ladies NL Hold'em Championship

$10k Entry - $1000 for Ladies

Thurs, June 28th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,000

58

No-Limit Hold'em 6-HandedThur, June 28th, 3:00 PM3 Day$5,000

59

NL Hold'em Super Turbo Bounty

$300 Bounties

Fri, June 29th, 11:00 AM1 Da$1,000

60

PLO Hi-Lo 8 or Better ChampionshipFri, June 29th, 11:00 AM3 Days$10,000

61

WSOP.com ONLINE No-Limit Hold'em

Unlimited re-entry

Fri, June 29th, 3:30 PM1 Day$1,000

62

CRAZY EIGHTS - No-Limit Hold'em 8-Handed

Unlimited re-entry - $888,888 Guarantee for 1st place

Sat, June 30th, 10:00 AM4 Days$888

62B

CRAZY EIGHTS - No-Limit Hold'em 8-Handed

Unlimited re-entry - $888,888 Guarantee for 1st place

Sat, June 30th, 5:00 PM4 Days$888

62C

CRAZY EIGHTS - No-Limit Hold'em 8-Handed

Unlimited re-entry - $888,888 Guarantee for 1st place

Sun, July 1st, 10:00 AM3 Days$888

62D

CRAZY EIGHTS - No-Limit Hold'em 8-Handed

Unlimited re-entry - $888,888 Guarantee for 1st place

Sun, July 1st, 5:00 PM3 Days$888

63

WSOP.com Online NL Hold'em High Roller

Unlimited re-entry

Sat, June 30th, 3:30 PM1 Day$3,200

64

7 Card Stud Hi-Lo 8 or BetterSun, July 1st, 11:00 AM3 Days$10,000

65

No-Limit Hold'em Main EventMon, July 2nd, 11:00 AM13 Days$10,000

65B

No-Limit Hold'em Main EventTues, July 3rd, 11:00 AM12 Days$10,000

65C

No-Limit Hold'em Main EventWed, July 4th, 11:00 AM11 Days$10,000

66

No-Limit Hold'emThur, July 5th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

67

Pot Limit Omaha Bounty

$500 bounties

Fri, July 6th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

68

The Little One for One Drop

Unlimted re-entry

Sat, July 7th, 11:00 AM5 Days$1,111

68B

The Little One for One Drop

Unlimted re-entry

Sun, July 8th, 11:00 AM4 Days$1,111

68C

The Little One for One Drop

Unlimted re-entry

Mon, July 9th, 11:00 AM5 Days$1,111

69

Pot Limit Omaha 6-handed

One re-entry

Sun, July 8th, 3:00 PM3 Days$3,000

70

Limit Hold'em 6-handedMon, July 9th, 3:00 PM3 Days$3,000

71

No Limit Hold'em

30 minute levels

Tue, July 10th, 11:00 AM2 Days$5,000

72

Mixed NL Hold'em/PLO Omaha 8-handedTue, July 10th, 3:00 PM3 Days$1,500

73

Double Stack NL Hold'em

10k starting chips - 30 minute levels

Wed, July 11th, 11:00 AM2 Days$1,000

74

NL Hold'em 6-handed ChampionshipWed, July 11th, 3:00 PM3 Days$10,000

75

The Closer - No Limit Hold'em

$1,000,000 guarantee - Unlimited Re-entry

Thur, July 12th, 11:00 AM4 Days$1,500

75B

The Closer - No Limit Hold'em

$1,000,000 guarantee - Unlimited Re-entry

Fri, July 13th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,500

75C

The Closer - No Limit Hold'em

$1,000,000 guarantee - Unlimited Re-entry

Sat, July 14th, 11:00 AM2 Days$1,500

76

H.O.R.S.E.Thur, July 12th, 3:00 PM3 Days$3,000

77

No-limit Hold'em High Roller

One Re-entry

Fri, July 13th, 3:00 PM2 Days$50,000

78

The Big One for One Drop

$1,000,000 No-Limit Hold'em

Sun, July 15th, 11:00 AM3 Days$1,000,000

If you are still curious about how you can qualify for the World Series of Poker, please check out our WSOP Qualifying section below.

History of the World Series of Poker

If you know a thing or two about the World Series of Poker Main Event, you know that it attracts upwards of 6,500 players per year to the tournament - last year's event saw 6,683 players compete for the first place prize of $10 million.

But did you know that the first WSOP back in 1970 featured just seven players? In fact, the Main Event field didn't even reach double digits until 1973. And it took until 1982 to reach triple digits.

It all started back in 1970 when Benny Binion invited six of the absolute best poker players he knew to play No Limit Texas Hold'em in front of a live audience at his Horseshoe casino. His friend included Johnny Moss, Amarillo "Slim" Preston, Brian "Sailor" Roberts, Doyle Brunson, Walter "Puggy" Pearson, Crandall Addington, and Carl Cannon.

2018's WSOP champion will have to play the best final hand to win but at the first World Series of Poker event, the winner was decided by peer votes. That' s a far cry from the grueling week-and-a-half of practically nonstop tournament play poker players have to go through to be crowned champions these days.

While the 1970 tournament was an invitational event, 1971 saw the tournament open up to poker players with a buy-in of $5,000. In 1972, the buy-in doubled to $10,000. It has remained at $10,000 ever since. So if you want to just buy your way straight into the WSOP 2018 Main Event, it won't be cheap. There are loads still of ways to get into 2018's WSOP tournament for just a few dollars or for free though!

In 2004, Harrah's purchased The Horseshoe Casino and with it the rights to the World Series of Poker. In 2005, the series was moved to the Rio Hotel & Casino, a Harrah's-owned property. The series has been held there ever since.

How online poker changed the tournament forever

You don't have to travel too far back in time to see how online poker dramatically changed the World Series of Poker for the better. Just look back to 2003.

It was then that a relatively unknown poker player named Chris Moneymaker qualified for his WSOP Main Event seat through an online qualifier at Poker Stars. And he won, taking the tournament's first place prize pool of $2.5 million.

In 2003, the Main Event saw a field of 839 poker players. After Moneymaker's unexpected win, online poker sites saw an explosion in traffic, with millions of people signing up to hone their game.

In 2004, the field more than tripled, with 2,576 players sitting down to play in the Main Event. And the following year, the field more than doubled again, jumping up to 5,619 players.

In 2006, the WSOP Main Event field set a record with an all-time high of 8,773. Change in US law forced a few sites to dive out of the US market later that year, so subsequent years saw Main Event field drops. But for the most part, the field has remained in the mid-6000s and above.

Online poker has even helped other tournament series grow in conjunction with the WSOP. Large-scale tournament circuits, such as the European Poker Tour and the World Poker Tour, continue to grow both in numbers and prize pools. However, the World Series continues to be the grandaddy of them all, both in scale and reputation.

How to enter the 2018 World Series of Poker Main Event

If you want to play in the World Series of Poker Main Event in 2018, there are several ways to win your seat.

  • How can I qualify for the World Series of Poker?

    You can win your way through an online poker qualifier. While the big two sites - PokerStars and Full Tilt - no longer serve US players, they still offer WSOP qualifiers to players around the world, along with our top rated poker site, 888 Poker.

  • Enter WSOP Satellites

    With online qualifiers, or satellites, you can win entry in to the WSOP 2018 Main Event for as little as just a few dollars. Poker sites hold satellites that feed into larger tournaments. By winning a series of tournaments, or even a single satellite tournament, you can make your way to Las Vegas for next to nothing and get to experience all the drama that's bound to play out at this years tournament.

    Serious online poker players who have patience and time usually get started with trying to qualify early. Note that with online poker sites' satellites, you'll often receive your WSOP 2018 Main Event entry in cash. It is normally then your responsibility to buy yourself into 2018's WSOP Main Event.

  • Buy directly in

    Got $10,000 lying around? Bring it to Vegas and buy directly in to the WSOP 2018 Main Event.

  • Qualify in Vegas

    If you want to play in the Main Event but you're short on funds this year, you can enter a live satellite. The WSOP hosts daily tournaments at the Rio with buy-ins that come in way under the $10,000 Main Event cost. Successful players earn tournament chips that can be used in any of the WSOP 2018 gold bracelet tournaments.

10 Interesting facts about the WSOP

  • 1

    The largest Main Event win was claimed by Jamie Gold in 2006. Gold walked away with $12 million.

  • 2

    The largest turnout for the Main Event of the WSOP was also in 2006 - a total of 8,773 players came out to play.

  • 3

    The total prize pool in 2006? $82,512,162 - just for the Main event.

  • 4

    The largest World Series of Poker prize was won by Antonio Esfandiari in 2012. He took down the $1 million buy-in charity tournament, The Big One for One Drop. His prize? $18.3 million.

  • 5

    Phil Hellmuth holds the record for the largest number of WSOP bracelets at 13.

  • 6

    Hellmuth also holds the record for the highest number of cashes at 95, and most final tables at 49.

  • 7

    Johnny Moss and Stu Ungar are tied for the most Main Event wins at 3 apiece.

  • 8

    Between 1993 and 2006, the Main Event player pool continue to climb. And with it, so did the prize pool, jumping from 220 players and a $1 million prize pool in 1993 to the $12 million prize pool in 2006.

  • 9

    In 2007, for the first time in well over a decade, the WSOP Main Event experienced a decrease in the number of entrants, dropping from an all-time high of 8,773 in 2006 to 6,358 in 2007. That's a difference of 2,415 players. The big drop is widely attributed to the change in US law that made it illegal for a financial institution to process an online gambling transaction. Several sites that had fed players to the WSOP Main Event stopped serving US players, including Party Poker and Paradise Poker. And many sites that stayed in the US market paid players $10,000 cash instead of organizing their buy-ins, causing many players to choose cash over a Main Event seat.

  • 10

    You don't have to be young to play in the WSOP. The oldest person to play in the World Series of Poker was Jack Ury, who was 97 when he played in the Main Event.

How the WSOP compares to other live events

The World Series of Poker isn't for everyone. With upwards of 6,500 players competing for the title, it can be an unbelievably grueling experience, especially for first-time poker players who might be great online but not so amazing playing live for the first time in 2018.

If you're used to a casual, relaxed atmosphere, you're better off with a tournament like the Punta Cana Poker Classic or the Caribbean Adventure event rather than the 2018 WSOP. With a beach located just steps from the tournament floor at those tournaments, it's hard to feel bad about busting out.

On the other side of the poker chip, the WSOP parks you in a room with several thousand sweaty poker players, each one with their eye on the prize. If you make it beyond the first few days of the 2018 tournament, chances are you won't see anything outside the Rio. You'll want to sleep between poker flights and recharge for the next day. If you bust out early, you'll want to catch an earlier flight home so you can get out of Sin City and the brutal desert heat fast.

Still, even with the thousands of players to contend with, even with the brutal Nevada heat blaring down on you, the WSOP is an amazing experience that needs to be seen to be believed. Why not make 2018 the year you finally get to the WSOP?!

While the smaller tournaments offer a kind of poker vacation, the 2018 WSOP is all business with a prize pool that runs in the tens of millions, just for the Main Event. At other poker tournament vacations, you play hard to win the title. At the WSOP, you work for it and in the end you might just be rewarded with the ultimate glory; the tiles of WSOP 2018 Champion.

There's more to the 2018 WSOP than the Main Event

While the $10,000 buy-in Main Event always steals the poker media spotlight, the 2018 World Series of Poker features 62 separate gold bracelet events. Buy-ins for the public run as low as $1,000 (there's a $500 buy-in event, but that's for casino employees only).

Many players who win a $10,000 Main Event seat use their cash to buy into the smaller events. After all, it's easier to play in a handful of smaller events and gain fame and fortune for the rest of 2018 than it is to make a dent in 2018's Main Event.

Past WSOP Winners

2017

Hailing from Brigantine, New Jersey, Scott Blumstein took this year's WSOP Main Event bracelet. This win saw Blumstein take home a huge $8,150,000, almost a whole 150K more than last year, after beating a staggering 7,221 players to the prize pool. Blumstein's win was one for the underdogs, similarly unknown like the 2016 winner. Overall, 1,084 players took home winnings from the Main Event.

2016

The 2016 World Series of Poker saw Qui Nguyen take the number one spot from a potential 6,737 players, a few hundred more than the previous year. Nguyen won the Main Event by heads-up against Gordon Vayo on the final table and walked away with $8,005,310. The top 1,011 players finished in the money this year and saw Vayo take second place with Cliff Josephy coming in third.

2015

The 46th annual WSOP event took place in 2015, and it was held at Vegas's famous Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino (just like all the WSOP tournaments in the past 9 years). The event drew 6,420 players, creating a prize pool of a whooping $60,348,000. The top 1,000 players won some money, with all of the final table players bringing home at least $1 million each. Joe McKeehen, the first place winner, won $7,683,346. The second place winner was Joshua Beckley and he won $4,470,896.

2014

Once again held at Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the 2014 WSOP tournament had 6,683 entrants and a prize pool of $62,820,200. The first person who got out at the final table (also known as the ninth place winner) was Mark Newhouse, and he brought home $730,725. The second place winner was Felix Stephensen, and he brought home $5,147,911. Martin Jacobson placed first and brought home a cool $10 million.

2013

The 2013 WSOP tournament had 6,352 entrants and a prize pool of $59,708,800. The first place winner, who was Ryan Riess (also known as "Reiss the Beast"), won $8,359,531. Jay Farber was the second place winner and he netted himself a prize of $5,174,357. The tournament was held at Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada.

2012

The 43rd annual WSOP event took place at Vegas's Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in 2012. In this tournament, a prize pool of $62,021,200 was created with 6,598 entrants. Everyone who placed in the top 666 won some money. The top nine players brought home at least $750,000. The second place winner, Jesse Sylvia, won $5,295,149, and the first place winner, Greg Merson, won $8,531,853.

2011

Hosted by Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, the 2011 WSOP tournament attracted 6,865 entrants and a prize pool of $64,531,000 was put together. The first place winner, Pius Heinz, got to bring home a good chunk of the prize. More specifically, he won $8,715,638. Martin Staszko, the second place winner, made a pretty penny, too. In other words, he won $5,433,086.

List of winners in 1970-2010

YearWinnerPlacePrize
2010 Jonathan Duhamel Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$8,944,138
2009 Joe Cada Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$8,574,649
2008 Peter Eastgate Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$9,152,416
2007 Jerry Yang Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$8,250,000
2006 Jamie Gold Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$12,000,000
2005 Joe Hachem Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$7,500,000
2004 Greg Raymer Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$5,000,000
2003 Chris Moneymaker Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$2,500,000
2002 Robert Varkonyi Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$2,000,000
2001 Carlos Mortensen Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,500,000
2000 Chris Ferguson Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,500,000
1999 Noel Furlong Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1998 Scotty Nguyen Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1997 Stu Ungar Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1996 Huck Seed Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1995 Dan Harrington Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1994 Russ Hamilton Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1993 Jim Bechtel Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1992 Hamid Dastmalchi Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1991 Brad Daugherty Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$1,000,000
1990 Mansour Matloubi Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$895,000
1989 Phil Hellmuth Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$755,000
1988 Johnny Chan Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$700,000
1987 Johnny Chan Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$625,000
1986 Berry Johnston Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$570,000
1985 Bill Smith Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$700,000
1984 Jack Keller Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$660,000
1983 Tom McEvoy Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$540,000
1982 Jack Straus Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$520,000
1981 Stu Ungar Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$375,000
1980 Stu Ungar Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$385,000
1979 Hal Fowler Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$270,000
1978 Bobby Baldwin Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$210,000
1977 Doyle Brunson Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$340,000
1976 Doyle Brunson Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$220,000
1975 Brian Roberts Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$210,000
1974 Johnny Moss Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$160,000
1973 Walter Pearson Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$130,000
1972 Thomas Preston Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$80,000
1971 Johnny Moss Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada$30,000
1970 Johnny Moss Binion's Horseshoe Casino in Las Vegas, Nevadaprize unknown

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *