Research Paper Resources Examples Of Idioms

A good example of a science-oriented idiom would be to “blind someone with science” which means to confuse someone with language that is highly technical. Another would be “to have something down to a science” which means something is totally understood and managed extremely well.  Let’s look at more idioms that refer to science and some that are included in science jargon.

Science Idioms

Science is a very broad field and there are many idioms that could be related to science.  Here are some examples (the idiomatic expression is listed first, along with the meaning after it):

  • All singing all dancing - latest version of something with newest features
  • Bells and whistles - all the features of a new product
  • Blow a fuse - get very angry
  • Fire on all cylinders - everything is working well
  • Garbage in garbage out - refers to a computer system or database
  • Get the wires crossed - not understanding someone
  • Light years ahead - out in front with new developments or successes
  • Not rocket science - easy to do or understand
  • On the same wavelength - means to have the same ideas and opinions
  • Silver surfer - an older person who uses the Internet
  • Sputnik moment - when you realize you need to work harder to catch up
  • Well-oiled machine - anything that functions as it should
  • Hit the panic button - suddenly panic
  • In tune with someone - have the same ideas and opinions
  • Re-invent the wheel - waste time doing something that has already been done in an effective way
  • Cog in the machine - a person or thing that is part of a larger system
  • As easy-as-pie - something simple or easy
  • A piece of cake - something simple or easy
  • Up and running - ready for use
  • Beat your brains out - try hard to understand something, like a scientific concept
  • Bent out of shape - worried about or stressed about something needlessly
  • The bottom line - the most essential or key information
  • Burn the midnight oil - study or work all night
  • Make heads or tails of it - Understand something, like a difficult science concept
  • Cram - try to learn as much as possible in a short time, such as trying to learn lot of science information all at once.
  • Elbow grease - effort and hard work

Science can also include a study of the senses, animals, and food. Some idioms related to these scientific categories include:

  • A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush - do not take a risk and lose everything
  • Actions speak louder than words - take action instead of just talking about it.
  • Apple of my eye - a person who is loved
  • Bark up the wrong tree - made a wrong decision
  • Bite your tongue - to not talk
  • Change horses in midstream - make different plans after starting something
  • Cry wolf - false alarm
  • Eat crow - admit you were wrong
  • Half-baked - a plan that has not been carefully made or thought about
  • Hit the bulls-eye - make the correct point
  • Hot potato - a controversial issue
  • Lend me your ear - ask someone to listen
  • Make a mountain out of a molehill - make unimportant things important
  • Monkey business - unscrupulous actions
  • Piece of cake - something easy to do
  • Polish the apple - to flatter
  • Smell a rat - suspect something bad
  • Take with a grain of salt - only believe part of something
  • Turn a blind eye - ignoring something that is unethical or illegal
  • Worth one’s salt - being a good employee or being worth the money
  • Kick the bucket - die
  • Bright as a button - smart
  • Not the brightest bulb - dumb
  • Bull-headed - inflexible or stubborn
  • By the skin of your teeth - just barely succeed at something
  • An eager beaver - someone always excited and willing to do something extra
  • An egghead - a very smart person

These different idioms are all related to the science of the human condition or of plants and animals. Because science is such a broad field and because there are so many idioms in the English language, there is a good chance you'll hear idioms related to science on a regular basis.

Do you have a good example to share? Add your example here.

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What Are Examples of Idioms Related to Science?

By YourDictionary

A good example of a science-oriented idiom would be to “blind someone with science” which means to confuse someone with language that is highly technical. Another would be “to have something down to a science” which means something is totally understood and managed extremely well.  Let’s look at more idioms that refer to science and some that are included in science jargon.

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Lesson Plan

Figurative Language: Teaching Idioms

 

Grades3 – 5
Lesson Plan TypeStandard Lesson
Estimated TimeThree 45-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Publisher

 

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OVERVIEW

By developing a clear understanding of figurative language, students can further comprehend texts that contain metaphorical and lexical meanings beyond the basic word level. In this lesson, students explore figurative language with a focus on the literal versus the metaphorical translations of idioms. Through read-alouds, teacher modeling, and student-centered activities that are presented in the classroom, students will further develop their understanding of figurative language.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

  • Eye on Idioms: Your students can use this interactive online tool to view literal representations of selected idioms, complete the sentence by selecting the correct idiom from the list, determine the metaphorical meaning of the idiom, and then use the idiom in a sentence to show their understanding of its meaning.

  • Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms by Marvin Terban (Scholastic, 1998): Students can use this great resource to research idioms, including their origins and how their origins relate to the metaphorical meaning of the phrases.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Nilsen, A.P. & Nilsen, D.L.F. (2003). A new spin on teaching vocabulary: A source-based approach. The Reading Teacher, 56, 436–439.

  • By knowing the origins of idioms, students can more easily figure out the metaphorical meanings.

  • Discussions focused on the origins of words and phrases help students understand how language transforms over time and, thereby, enables them to hypothesize in a more meaningful way the meaning of unfamiliar words or phrases.

 

Zigo, D. (2001). From familiar worlds to possible worlds: Using narrative theory to support struggling readers' engagements with texts. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 45, 62–70.

  • When teachers encourage students' natural inclinations toward narrative forms of meaning making, in conjunction with text-based lessons, the students appear more engaged with textual content and demonstrate less resistance to reading material that might otherwise be challenging or frustrating.

  • Students respond to texts through narrative approaches, encouraging them to engage in role-playing and to allow memories, images, and stories to surface as they begin to develop interpretations.

  • Students are more likely to understand, recall, and care about what a metaphor means after having played with the word through a highly personalized, storied exploration of their own experiences of metaphorical language.

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Standards

NCTE/IRA NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

3.

Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

 

6.

Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

 

12.

Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

 

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Resources & Preparation

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

  • In a Pickle and Other Funny Idioms by Marvin Terban (Houghton Mifflin, 1983)

  • More Parts by Tedd Arnold (Dial Books for Young Readers, 2001)

  • Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms by Marvin Terban (Scholastic, 1998)

  • Drawing paper, colored pencils, crayons, and markers

  • Multiple computers with Internet access

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STUDENT INTERACTIVES

Grades   3 – 5  |  Student Interactive  |  Learning About Language

Eye on Idioms

The activity includes a series of exercises, in which students view the literal representations of idioms and then examine the metaphorical meanings of the idioms.

 

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Instructional Plan

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will

  • Explore the use of figurative language in texts

  • Identify the literal representations of idioms through class discussions, drawings, and writing

  • Discuss connections between idioms and their personal experiences

  • Research the origins of selected idioms to reinforce the metaphorical meanings

  • Show an understanding of the metaphorical meanings of selected idioms by using them in sentences

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Session 1

1.Read aloud More Parts by Tedd Arnold. Discuss the text with students, asking about the idioms presented and what they mean in comparison to what the main character translates them to mean.

2.Brainstorm other idioms that students have heard. To get the discussion started, ask students what they know about the phrases "it's raining cats and dogs" and "saved by the bell." Ask them to draw upon their personal experiences and background knowledge to discuss these idioms and any others that they can think of. Prompting questions might include:
  • Have you heard anyone in your family (like your parents or grandparents) use idioms when speaking?

  • Which idioms do you use?

  • Have you heard idioms used in television programs or movies?
For each personal experience, ask the student to describe how the idiom was used and how he or she was able to decipher the figurative meaning.

3.On the board or chart paper, list all of the idioms mentioned during the class discussion and refer to the list as needed during the remainder of the lesson. Discuss how some idioms are passed down through generations. This discussion gives students a preliminary introduction to the historical meaning of idioms.

4.Develop a class definition of idioms. Write the definition on chart paper and hang the sheet on the wall for reference purposes.

5.Have students select their favorite idiom from the list and draw a literal representation of the phrase. Model this activity on chart paper by selecting an idiom and roughly drawing a literal representation of it. For example, the phrase “it's raining cats and dogs” can be shown by drawing a picture of a storm cloud with cats and dogs falling as raindrops. Instruct students to include the literal drawing on one side of a sheet of paper and to write the idiom on the back. (Students may need to complete this activity for homework).

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Session 2

1.Read aloud In a Pickleand Other Funny Idioms by Marvin Terban. Discuss the metaphorical meanings of the idioms presented in this text.

2.Have students present the literal representations of their favorite idioms while their classmates try to guess the idioms that are represented in the drawings and determine their metaphorical meanings. To determine the metaphorical meanings, students can think back to the discussions in Session 1 where their classmates shared their personal experiences with the various idioms.

3.Have students, working in pairs, select four to five idioms to research using the Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms or another resource.

4.After researching the idioms, ask each pair of students to select one idiom from their list, share its origins, and how its origins relate to the metaphorical meaning of the phrase. To ensure understanding of the metaphorical meaning, have students use each idiom in a sentence as well.

5.Encourage a class discussion on how knowing the historical context of idioms and reflecting on personal experiences can make it easier to understand the metaphorical meanings of these phrases.

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Session 3

1.Have students go online to the interactive Eye on Idioms where they can view additional literal representations of selected idioms. In this activity, students are asked to complete the sentence by selecting the correct idiom from the list, determine the metaphorical meaning of the idiom, and then use the idiom in a sentence to show their understanding of its meaning. Students should be reminded to print their work after completing each idiom exercise since their work cannot be saved electronically.

2.Once students have completed the online activity, ask them to research the origins of each idiom and type a short passage to explain how the origins of the phrase relates to its metaphorical meaning. Students can also write about any personal experiences with each idiom and how those experiences helped them to determine the metaphorical meaning.

3.As a final project, students can compile their printed idioms and typed passages and bind them together on opposing pages to create an idiom book. This book makes a great reference for students to use for their own reading and writing in the future.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Develop an "Idiom Wall" where students can post idioms that they discover while reading. (You may choose to offer extra credit points for finding idioms during reading activities.)

  • Have students continue to research the history of particular idioms and the original context in which they were developed using resources such as the Scholastic Dictionary of Idioms.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

Evaluate each student’s ability to:

  • Participate in class discussions

  • Draw upon previous experiences to discuss the usage and meaning of idioms

  • Draw literal representations of selected idioms

  • Correctly explain the historical origins of selected idioms and use the origins to further understand the metaphorical meanings

  • Recognize and explain the metaphorical meanings of selected idioms from the interactive Eye on Idioms

  • Use selected idioms in sentences to show an understanding of their meanings

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Related Resources

STUDENT INTERACTIVES

Grades   3 – 5  |  Student Interactive  |  Learning About Language

Eye on Idioms

The activity includes a series of exercises, in which students view the literal representations of idioms and then examine the metaphorical meanings of the idioms.

 

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CALENDAR ACTIVITIES

Grades   3 – 12  |  Calendar Activity  |  February 14

Valentine's Day is today!

Students find examples of figurative language and write an original example of each device, illustrate, and share them with the class.

 

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ACTIVITIES & PROJECTS

Grades   4 – 8  |  Activity & Project

Unveiling Idioms: A Game of Concentration

Brainstorm popular expressions with friends and family, then explore their meanings through game play and writing/drawing/cut-and-paste activities.

 

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Comments

Sonja Virden

November 20, 2011

I love this lesson. I can't wait to get more ideas for planning lessons. Thank you...from a poor college student.

 

 

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