Case Study For Student Analysis Comm 215 Week 1

Design - Student Center Case Study and Analysis (Complete)

5503 WordsSep 29th, 201123 Pages

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Table of Contents

Definition ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Design Parameters ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
Design Strategies ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Case Studies of a Student Center Foreign ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Local ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 18
Site Analysis ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 24
Bibliography ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 27
Space Programming ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 28
Space Inter-Relationship Matrix ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 33
Bubble Diagram ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 34

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Definition

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The recently constructed building includes a two-story gathering area articulated with a vaulted roof, clerestory windows, exposed split-face concrete masonry column and exposed steel trusses. To balance scale and dimension, designers created a floor design that both complements the natural surroundings and proportions the space. Armstrong™ Stonetex EXELON® vinyl composition tile (VCT) allowed the design team to create a pattern that handsomely meets aesthetic goals and satisfies the need for cost efficiency.
The design challenge for architectural firm Sheehan Van Woert Bigotti Architects was to create a large gathering space on campus that managed to incorporate an inviting and comfortable atmosphere for congregation, studying and conversation. The Student Center, which serves as the campus student services facility, is the third major building design project the firm has completed for the community college. For the circulation spaces of the main student lounge and mezzanine areas, Stonetex is used in multiple, organic colors. The design was influenced by similar projects including the Perry Community Education Campus in Ohio and the Orland Park Village Center in Illinois. In all these applications, the floor

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Communication Course Descriptions

All course descriptions carry behind the name and number a parenthesis ( ) indicating the credit hours, lecture hours, and the lab hours per week. For example: NSCI 110 (4-3-2). The first number in the parenthesis indicates the credit value of the course (4); the second number indicates the number of lecture hours (3) per week; and the third number indicates the number of lab hours per week (2).

CHIN 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary Chinese I: This course introduces the basics of Chinese language - the pinyin, characters and grammar. Students are expected to learn about 150 single characters and 200 compound words of modern standard Chinese. The course emphasizes speaking and reading as well as writing.
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CHIN 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary Chinese II: The course is designed to build up basic vocabulary for conversation, reading and writing, and improve students' comprehension in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 110
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CHIN 210  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Chinese I: The course is designed to enhance students' abilities in speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. Students will not only learn complicated conversations but also use vocabularies and sentence structures to discuss social and political issues. They will also learn to write narratives and short essays.
Prerequisite: CHIN 120
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CHIN 220  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Chinese II: This course is designed to continue to enhance students' abilities in speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. Students will not only learn complicated conversations but also use vocabularies and sentence structures to discuss social and political issues. They will also learn to write narratives and short essays.
Prerequisite: CHIN 210
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CHIN 310  (3-3-0)  Advanced Chinese I: This course is designed to further improve the students' reading and writing abilities as well as spoken ability in Chinese. Students taking the course will be exposed to essays, prose, movies, short novels, and poems in their original forms either in classical Chinese or modern Chinese. They will discuss these readings in class and then write their argumentation papers in Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 220
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CHIN 330  (3-3-0)  Classical Chinese Literature: This survey course is examines the long tradition of Chinese literature, from its genesis to the mid-19th century before it was transformed under the influence from the West. We will look into the diversity and richness of this tradition while tracing its dramatic historical changes in a time period of nearly three thousand years. In addition to studying prose and poetry, we will also consider historical content as well as social and philosophical writings. Students are expected not just to learn the long and rich tradition but, more importantly, to reconstruct it through the texts they are to read and papers they are to write. All course materials are in English.
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CHIN 331  (3-3-0)  Modern Chinese Language: In this survey course, students will read key literary texts by important writers in modern Chinese writers, including Lu Xun, Yu Dafu, Ding Ling (Ting Ling), Shen Congwen (Shen Tsung-wen), Zhang, Ailing (Eilen Chang), and Wang Anyi. The course explores issues of nationalism, modernity and globalization as represented in Chinese Literature. By discussing these issues in literary contexts, students will gain a better understanding of cultural production and social change in modern Chinese history. All the texts are in English.
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CHIN 332  (3-3-0)  Cinema and Contemporary China: This course examines the technical, aesthetic, economical and historical interactions between contemporary Chinese cinema and contemporary Chinese society. Students will see the representative film works by contemporary Chinese directors from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, and analyze the various cinematic styles in relation to the social and historical changes in which the films were made. They will also discuss such issues as modernity, nationalism, and globalization that the Chinese people have dealt with in contemporary China. For students learning the Chinese language, this course will also offer many authentic linguistic materials. All texts are in English and/or with English
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COMM 201  (1-0-3)  Communication Activities: Practical supervised training through participation in departmental performance laboratories. Up to three hours of credit in COMM 201 can be applied to the 18 hour credit concentration in Mass Communication. Additional COMM 201 credit will be accepted as free electives.
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COMM 205  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Communication: The study of communication in expediting learning, affecting social interaction and effective change, and an exploration of the components of interpersonal, small group, public and organizational communication.
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COMM 210  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Mass Communications: A survey of the role of mass media in modern society. The process, functions, responsibility and effects of various forms of mass communication will be analyzed.
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COMM 211  (3-3-0)  Phonetics: A study of the production and transcription of phonetic symbols used in the International Phonetic Alphabet, with attention to general American speech and Career speech.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
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COMM 212  (3-3-0)  Voice and Diction: A study of proper breathing for good voice production, pause, stress, intonation, and control of resonance. Emphasis is placed on improving phonation, enunciation, and articulation.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
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COMM 215  (3-3-0)  Fundamentals of Journalism: This course presents the history and development of American journalism from colonial times to the present while focusing on its relationship to technical, political, social, and technological changes in America. Specific attention will be paid to events resulting in constraints to the media, attitudes of government toward the media, changes influenced by journalists and trends in journalism.
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COMM 220  (3-3-0)  Film & Video Appreciation: Examination of basic film and video media techniques and basic methods of analysis. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating film and video media as major forms of communication.
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COMM 230  (3-3-0)  News Reporting and Writing I: This course is designed to help students develop their niche for news reporting and writing. Students will be exposed to news gathering practices, write and report the news, and learn in unique styles of print as well as on-line journalism. It will explore the constant writing of news stories and emphasizes policy, principles, and concepts basic to the field of journalism.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
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COMM 235  (3-3-0)  Public Relations/Advertising: This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of public relations and advertising. Student will study the history and trends of the public relations and advertising industry focusing on principles, tools, techniques, practices, and ethics. Accepted standards used in public relations and advertising will be presented.
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COMM 240  (3-3-0)  News Editing: This course will focus on advanced and specialized public life news reporting for the print media. Employing sophisticated methods, including public records searches, computer-assisted reporting, and archival research, students will develop and polish their reporting and gain a greater understanding of how news is constructed in relation to institutions and people in public life. Students will learn the basis for crafting news stories that convey meaning as well as fact, and insight to the readers.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
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COMM 250  (3-3-0)  Presentation Technologies: A course offering students a detailed understanding of and specialized skills in the proper use of different presentation technologies. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of presentational media and will develop a critical awareness of these new media and their place in society. The overall goal is for students to learn how presentational technologies work, why they have become so instrumental in public communications, and when they are appropriate as a presentational strategy.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
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COMM 260  (3-3-0)  Interpersonal Communication: A study of the process of communication, including functions, models, and theories, with an emphasis on self-disclosure, empathic listening, relational communication, and conflict management.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
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COMM 275  (3-3-0)  Crisis Communication: This course examines the nature of crises in organizations and the role of communication in managing and minimizing such crises. This course will discuss types of crises, risk evaluation, crisis preparation, communication crisis planning, media management and crisis mitigation strategies, and post-crisis response. Students will create a real-world crisis communication plan that will be tested and evaluated.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210 Or with permission of instructor
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COMM 290  (3-3-0)  Nonverbal Communication: This course provides an in-depth study of physical appearance, gesture and movement, facial expressions, eye contact, touch, use of time, and voice to communicate nonverbally in a variety of interpersonal relationships across personal, professional, public, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210 Or with permission of instructor
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COMM 300  (3-3-0)  Magazine and Feature Writing: This course works within journalistic standards to focus on the skills needed to write topical, in-depth, human interest stories. Students learn to gather materials through interviews, research, and observation while cultivating their own writer's "voice" for the creation of comprehensive articles for publication in newspapers, magazines, Internet sites, and other media. Students will examine the discursive implications of magazine and feature writing, newspaper, radio, computer, polling, and advertising technologies. Students will assume a concrete understanding of editorial, sidebars, graphs, charts, and other supporting elements that enrich a story.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
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COMM 310  (3-3-0)  News Reporting and Writing II: This course further develops research, organization, and composition skills for the production of professional-quality articles for publication in newspapers, magazines, Internet sites, and other media. The course will introduce students to the field of investigative journalism, including career prospects, ethical concerns, basic interviewing techniques, finding and following documented sources, and writing stories for maximum interest and impact. Students will practice organizing materials and writing with clarity and precision.
Prerequisite: COMM 230
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COMM 311  (3-3-0)  Public Speaking: A study of the principles of effective public communication, focusing on speech preparation and design, audience analysis, and speech presentation in a variety of public situations.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
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COMM 315  (3-3-0)  Computer Mediated Communication: A class designed to initiate students to the field of study known as computer-mediated communication (CMC). Computers, their networks, and the content on them have significantly influenced our political, religious, commercial, personal, and professional lives. Students will explore both qualitative and quantitative scholarship that focuses upon the implications of online media in these settings.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
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COMM 320  (3-3-0)  Audio Production I: An introduction to the planning and production of audio in mass media, including practical studies of the uses of sound and the planning, scripting, rehearsing, and directing process of audio production.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 321  (3-3-0)  Group Discussion: Training and practice in the effective exchange of opinions on selected topics, with emphasis on studying group interactions during the process of discussion and observing the effects of parliamentary procedures on the conduct of groups in discussion.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
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COMM 330  (3-3-0)  Writing For Mass Media: A survey of the various forms of written expression in mass media.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
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COMM 332  (3-3-0)  Problems in Media Communication: This course will examine contemporary problems of mediated communication, including gatekeeping, propaganda, agenda setting, cultural transmission, regulation and censorship, regulation and censorship, and commercialization. Students will examine the discursive implications of newspaper, radio, television, film, computer, polling, and advertising technologies. Students will assume a rhetorical perspective to evaluate the role of these technologies in shaping public opinion and our perceptions of reality.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 340  (3-3-0)  Community Journalism: This course will examine community journalism as a defined niche within mainstream journalism. It is designed to give students greater insight into the tools and skills needed to work at the community level. Course explores different forms of community journalism from small-town newspapers to new ideas of community, including virtual communities. This course will help students use traditional and new media tools to find sources and to report, gather, and disseminate stories of interest to specific audiences. This course will also introduce students to citizen journalism and how to interact with and leverage citizen journalists.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
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COMM 341  (3-3-0)  Health Communication: This course provides an overview of the various areas of study within the health communication field. The class explores multiple communication issues relevant to health, including language, information processing, the social construction of health and illness, doctor-patient communication, and the relationship between professionals, patients, friends, families, and cultural institutions. In addition, the class has a strong practical aspect; emphasis is placed on assignments that require students to engage in projects involving the application of theoretical knowledge acquired during lectures and individual readings.
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COMM 342  (3-3-0)  Health Communication Campaigns: This course provides a hands-on introduction to the theories and practices of mediated health communication campaigns. Students learn the fundamental aspects of designing, implementing, and evaluating health campaigns, defined as systematic efforts to promote healthy behaviors and prevent disease, and to influence public opinion and policymaking about health and healthcare issues. Essential considerations for designing and implementing effective health campaigns are presented, including health behavior change theories; audience, message, and channel factors; the health and medical portrayals in news and entertainment media; and the role of PR in health communication campaigns.
Prerequisite: COMM 341 or instructor approval. Corequisite: COMM 250
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COMM 350  (3-3-0)  Telecommunications Management: A course exploring management functions in a telecommunications environment. Economic support patterns, programming, promotion, advertising, determination of community needs and facility operations will be covered.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 357  (3-3-0)  Gender and Communication: This course is an intensive examination of topics and issues that come under the label of communication and gender. Topics range from wage inequality to gender symmetry, gender difference, sexual orientations, gendered patterns of communication, gender socialization, violence and gender, and social policies on gender.
Prerequisite: COMM 205
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COMM 360  (3-3-0)  Video Production I: An introduction to the elements of television production, including cameras, audio, staging, lighting, graphics, recording, and special effects.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 365  (3-3-0)  Speechwriting: A comprehensive look at the history of and current trends in speechwriting in America with an emphasis on persuasion and the strategic employment of language. Students will learn and practice the art of effective speechmaking by studying both effective and inadequate models of oratory. Students will learn how to prepare various types of speeches for a variety of audiences and rhetorical situations, including how to manage new technologies in those situations.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200 And ENGL 120
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COMM 367  (3-3-0)  Electronic Broadcast Media Broadcasting: An examination of the role of programming in electronic broadcast media in modern society and the analysis of the process, functions, responsibility, and effects of various forms of electronic broadcast media programming.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 370  (3-3-0)  Communication Practicum: A practical study of an area of communications, with reading assignments supplementing course activities. Repeatable one time for Mass Communication Concentration elective credit.
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COMM 375  (3-3-0)  Organizational Communication: Organizational Communication provides the student with a background in theory and research about communication within organizations. The course focuses on interpersonal communication within organizations, small group communication within organizations, leadership and management within organizations and communication conflict within organizations.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
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COMM 380  (3-3-0)  Non-Broadcast Telecommunications Systems: An introduction to the use of telecommunications media in corporate, industrial, medical, educational, military, governmental and public service institutions.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 385  (3-3-0)  International Communication: This course surveys the communication systems of the world focusing on major newspaper networks, broadcasting and film consortia, and the Internet. Theories of international communication are used to compare and contrast the communication systems of different nations.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 390  (3-3-0)  Cable Communications: An examination of the cable television industry including technical aspects, franchising, programming, and government regulation.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 395  (3-3-0)  Communication Theory: Theoretical paradigms within the communication discipline are surveyed with attention given to the assumptions that undergird theoretical traditions and the types of research questions that can be studied from within different theoretical perspectives. Several traditional theoretical perspectives are presented, including Aristotelian analysis, symbolic interactionism, pragmatism, and technological determinism, along with modern theoretical approaches such as constructivism, discourse theory, and critical cultural approaches.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
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COMM 400  (3-3-0)  Advanced News Reporting and Writing: This course covers the process of gathering, writing, editing, and presenting the news on radio and television. Subject areas embrace the changing industry, finding the news, broadcast news writing mechanics, broadcast news writing style, the interview, writing broadcast copy, color, radio news, writing for the television newscast, delivering the news, broadcast news reporting, covering assignments, reporting planned events, reporting live, ethical issues, producing, hardware.
Prerequisite: COMM 230 And COMM 240
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COMM 401  (3-3-0)  Argumentation and Debate: A study of the process of argumentation, with special attention to the structure of argument, reasoning, and the nature of evidence.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200
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COMM 410  (3-3-0)  Communication Internship: A course providing students with opportunities for combining theory and practice by their arranging, outlining, and engaging in a program of practical experiences under the joint supervision of a communications organization or agency, and the course instructor. This course is repeatable for up to six hours of course credit.
Prerequisite: Junior Standing
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COMM 425  (3-3-0)  Rhetorical Theory and Criticism: This course focuses on basic rhetorical theory and a variety of rhetorical criticism methodologies. Students will study the importance of rhetoric as the field of study that investigates all forms of public persuasion. Students will learn about rhetoric as one of the oldest public professions and academic fields of study, the evolution of thought regarding rhetoric in society, how to conduct research in the field of communication using a rhetorical approach to communication, and how to apply these basic concepts in their own communication activities.
Prerequisite: SPEE 200 And COMM 205
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COMM 430  (3-3-0)  News and Public Affairs: A study of the principles, techniques, and forms of journalism, with students gaining experience in preparing, editing, and delivering news and public affairs materials for a variety of media.
Prerequisite: COMM 215
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COMM 440  (3-3-0)  Audio Production II: An advanced course in audio production techniques including remote setups, studio operations, and multi-track recording.
Prerequisite: COMM 320
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COMM 450  (3-3-0)  Telecommunications Law: Principles and case studies in communications law including constitutional guarantees, libel, privacy, contempt, privilege, copyright, and governmental regulatory agencies.
Prerequisite: COMM 210
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COMM 460  (3-3-0)  Video Production II: An advanced course in video production techniques providing a laboratory experience in production and direction of video projects.
Prerequisite: COMM 360
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COMM 470  (3-3-0)  Intercultural Communication: The course provides basic principles and rules for understanding intercultural communication and provides instruction on how to apply the principles when communicating in intercultural situations. The course also provides a wide range of examples and cases of communication practices in different cultures to increase the student's knowledge base about communication diversity in the world.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
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COMM 480  (3-3-0)  Communication, Technology, and Society: This reading and discussion course is designed to examine the connections among communication, technological development, and society. Students will explore how persuasive communication has affected our perception and employment of technology in society and how those technologies have, in turn, affected public discourse and interaction. Students will adopt a rhetorical perspective in evaluating and understanding classical primary and secondary readings in technological and scientific discourse.
Prerequisite: COMM 205 And COMM 210
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COMM 490  (3-3-0)  Communication Research: The development of mass communication theory is studied with attention given to the emergence of major paradigms of theory including the development of process and effective perspectives, the development of social learning perspectives, the development of uses and gratifications perspectives, and the development of critical and cultural perspectives.
Prerequisite: COMM 395
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FORL 210  (3-3-0)  Foreign Language I: This course is an introduction to a designated foreign language, and is intended for students with no prior knowledge of the language and culture it represents. Emphasis will be placed on the basic language skills (comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture. Course may be repeated for credit for different languages.
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FORL 220  (3-3-0)  Foreign Language II: This course is a continuation of FORL 210. FORL 220 will continue to improve on the language and cultural knowledge and skills acquired in FORL 210 with emphasis on comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as pragmatics.
Prerequisite: FORL 210
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FORL 250  (3-3-0)  Literature in Translation: This course is a survey of the literature written in foreign language but studied in English translation. It differs from ENGL 211, 212 in that they survey a wide variety of literary works originally in several languages while FORL 250 focuses on the literature of a single language. Students may take FORL 250 more than once for credit if taken in different languages.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 And ENGL 120
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FREN 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary French I: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of French-speaking peoples, with emphasis on the basic language skills. Laboratory practice required.
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FREN 111  (3-3-0)  Elementary French (Honors): An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of French speaking peoples, with treatment in greater breadth and depth than in French 110. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experiences.
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FREN 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary French II: A continuation of studies in the language, literature, and culture of French speaking peoples begun in FREN 110, including further development of the basic language skills, with special attention to improving oral language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: FREN 110
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FREN 121  (3-3-0)  Elementary French II (Honors): A continuation of honors studies in the language, literature, and culture of French-speaking peoples begun in FREN 111, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on increasing proficiency in oral language skills. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experiences.
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FREN 211  (3-3-0)  Intermediate French I: Intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of French speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with increased emphasis on reading comprehension and writing in French. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: FREN 120
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FREN 212  (3-3-0)  Intermediate French II: A continuation of intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of French-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on idiomatic usages and complex grammatical structures. Laboratory experience required.
Prerequisite: FREN 211
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FREN 311  (3-3-0)  French Conversation I: A course focusing on increasing fluency in conversational French. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: FREN 212
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FREN 312  (3-3-0)  French Conversation II: Conversation and Composition: A course focusing on developing the level of proficiency in the basic language skills necessary to complete advanced courses taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 311
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FREN 321  (3-3-0)  French Civilization and Culture: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of French speaking peoples, with attention given to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture. Taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 212
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FREN 322  (3-3-0)  Survey of French Literature I: A study of representative French literary works from earliest times to 1800. Taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 321
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FREN 331  (3-3-0)  Survey of French Literature II: A study of representative French literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Taught exclusively in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 321
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GERM 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary German I: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples, with emphasis on the basic language skills. Laboratory practice required.
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GERM 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary German II: A continuation of studies in the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples begun in GERM 110, including further development of the basic language skills, with special attention to improving oral language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: GERM 110
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GERM 211  (3-3-0)  Intermediate German I: Intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with increased emphasis on reading comprehension and writing in German. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: GERM 120
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GERM 212  (3-3-0)  Intermediate German II: A continuation of intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on idiomatic usages and complex grammatical structures. Laboratory experience required.
Prerequisite: GERM 211
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GERM 310  (3-3-0)  Advanced Conversation and Phonetics: A course focusing on developing the level of proficiency in the basic language skills necessary to complete advanced courses taught exclusively in German.
Prerequisite: GERM 212
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GERM 321  (3-3-0)  German Civilization: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of German-speaking peoples, with attention to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture. Taught exclusively in German.
Prerequisite: GERM 310
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SPAN 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary Spanish I: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, with emphasis on the basic language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: Placement test score
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SPAN 111  (3-3-0)  Elem Spanish: An introduction to the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, with treatment in greater breadth and depth than in Spanish 110. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experiences.
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SPAN 112  (3-3-0)  Spanish for the Professions I: This course is designed to prepare students to use elementary Spanish skills in their profession. Emphasis is given to oral skills, vocabulary to interact with colleagues and customers, and the Hispanic cultural particularities related to the workplace. Laboratory practice is required.
Prerequisite: Placement test score
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SPAN 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary Spanish II: A continuation of studies in the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples begun in SPAN 110, including further development of the basic language skills, with special attention to improving oral language skills. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 110 Or placement test scores
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SPAN 121  (3-3-0)  Elementary Spanish (Honors) II: A continuation of honors studies in the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples begun in SPAN 111, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on increasing proficiency in oral language skills. Laboratory practice required. Admission based upon an entrance examination, previous study, and other relevant experience.
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SPAN 122  (3-3-0)  Spanish for the Professions II: This course is a continuation of the studies begun in SPAN 112 that aim to prepare students to use elementary Spanish skills in their profession. Emphasis is given to oral skills, vocabulary to interact with colleagues and customers, and the Hispanic cultural particularities related to the workplace. Laboratory practice is required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 112 Or placement test scores
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SPAN 211  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish: Intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with increased emphasis on reading comprehension and writing in Spanish. Laboratory practice required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 120 Or placement test scores
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SPAN 212  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish II: A continuation of intermediate level studies of the language, literature, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples, including further development of the basic language skills, with special emphasis on idiomatic usages and complex grammatical structures. Laboratory experience required.
Prerequisite: SPAN 211 Or placement test scores
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SPAN 230  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish Conversation: This course will focus on speaking and listening skills and develop pronunciation and conversational skills. Students will review grammar and vocabulary as they explore and discuss Hispanic culture. Class is conducted entirely in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 212 Or placement test scores
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SPAN 240  (3-3-0)  Intermediate Spanish Composition: This course reinforces communicative written skills learned in intermediate courses and prepares students for courses at or beyond the 300 level. Readings and written compositions focus on cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. It is conducted entirely in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 212 Or placement test scores
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SPAN 300  (3-3-0)  Spanish for Business: An intermediate Spanish course focusing on developing communicative (oral and written) skills applicable to business in Hispanic contexts.
Prerequisite: SPAN 212
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SPAN 311  (3-3-0)  Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture: This course is a discussion based course focusing on speaking and listening skills and further development of pronunciation and conversational skills. Students will explore and discuss Hispanic culture and current events in the Spanish-speaking world. Class conducted entirely in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 230 Or challenge examination
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SPAN 312  (3-3-0)  is Advanced Spanish Composition and Culture: This course focuses primarily on Spanish composition and the practice of different writing styles through the study of Spanish-speaking cultures. Classroom instruction and discussion will be in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 240 Or challenge examination
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SPAN 320  (3-3-0)  Advanced Spanish Grammar: A comprehensive and systematic study of Spanish grammar to develop linguistic (phrase, sentence, paragraph structure) accuracy including correct spelling and utilization of appropriate vocabulary.
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SPAN 321  (3-3-0)  Spanish Civilization and Culture: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of Spain, with attention to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture of the Spanish people. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
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SPAN 322  (3-3-0)  Spanish-American Civilization and Culture: A study of the civilization, culture, and history of Spanish-America, with attention to the life, customs, philosophy, art, music, and general patterns of culture of Spanish American peoples.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
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SPAN 331  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish Literature I: A study of representative Spanish literary works from earliest times to 1700. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 321
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SPAN 332  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish Literature II: A study of representative Spanish literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 321
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SPAN 341  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish-American Literature I: A survey of Spanish-American literature in the context of historical and social backgrounds, covering the period from colonization to independence. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 322
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SPAN 342  (3-3-0)  Survey of Spanish-American Literature II: A continuation of the survey of Spanish-American literature in the context of historical and social backgrounds, spanning the period from independence to the present. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 322
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SPAN 350  (3-3-0)  Study Abroad Project: This course is taken while abroad and expands on cultural aspects related to the host country. This course requires contact hours with faculty and a research project written in Spanish or English.
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SPAN 411  (3-3-0)  The Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel: A study of Spanish novels from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including works by Galdos, Pereda, Blasco-lbanez, and Pedro de Alcarcon, with attention to the historical and cultural contexts of the readings. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Or SPAN 332
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SPAN 420  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Spanish Linguistics I: Phonetics and Phonology: A descriptive and comparative study of the Spanish language and its varieties in Spain and Latin America focusing on the phonetic and phonological components, while establishing contrasts with respective counterparts in the English language, and related pedagogical implications. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
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SPAN 421  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Spanish Linguistics II: Morphology, Syntax and Semantics: A comparative study of the morphological, syntactic, and semantic components of the Spanish language while establishing contrasts with respective counterparts in the English language, and related pedagogical implications. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
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SPAN 431  (3-3-0)  Drama of the Golden Age: A study of the works of Spain's leading dramatists of the Golden Age: Lope de Vega, Calderon, Tirso de Molina, and Juan Ruiz de Alarcon. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Or SPAN 332
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SPAN 441  (3-3-0)  Cervantes: A study of Cervantes, with analytical reading of Don Quixote and of selected Novelas Ejemplares. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 332 Or SPAN 331
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SPAN 450  (3-3-0)  Spanish Language Studies: Special Topics: An advanced Spanish course that focuses on diverse topics such as the history of the Spanish language, medical or legal Spanish, and translation. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: SPAN 312
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SPAN 451  (3-3-0)  Contemporary Spanish: A study of major literary works in Spanish, from the Generation of 1898 to the present, with attention to literary trends and cultural influences that contributed to the shaping of the literature. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 332 Or SPAN 331
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SPAN 460  (3-3-0)  Cultural Topics: Hispanic World: An advanced Spanish course that focuses on diverse cultural topics to include such topics as folklore and Latin American women. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: SPAN 321 Or SPAN 322
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SPAN 461  (3-3-0)  Studies in Latin American Prose Fiction: A study of the developments in Latin American drama and poetry, with emphasis on changes occurring in the literature during the twentieth century. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 342 Or SPAN 341
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SPAN 470  (3-3-0)  Hispanic Literature: Special Topics: An advanced Spanish course that focuses on diverse cultural topics to include such topics as women writers, the Mexican Revolution, and social protest. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Or SPAN 332 Or SPAN 341 Or SPAN 342
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SPAN 471  (3-3-0)  Studies in Latin American Prose Fiction: A study of representative twentieth century novels and short stories by Latin American writers. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 342 Or SPAN 341
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SPAN 481  (3-3-0)  Senior Seminar: Current Issues in the Spanish-Speaking World: Critical analysis of specific current topics including Hispanic culture and/or Spanish literature and/or Spanish linguistics. Taught exclusively in Spanish.
Prerequisite: Senior status and permission of instructor
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SPEE 200  (3-3-0)  Introduction to Speech: An introduction to the development of effective oral communication through instruction in theory and practice of the principles and skills required in common types of speaking situations. Basic skills in audience analysis, research, organization, outlining, utilizing evidence, reasoning, listening, and verbal/nonverbal expression are developed. Various methods of delivery are examined and practiced.
Prerequisite: ENGL 120 (may be taken concurrently)
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YORU 110  (3-3-0)  Elementary Yoruba I: The course is an introduction to Yoruba, and is intended for students with no prior knowledge of the language and culture of Yorubaland. It is designed to introduce the learner to the fundamentals of Yoruba ┐ the language, the culture, and the people. The course emphasizes spoken and written Yoruba, as used in present day West Africa.
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YORU 120  (3-3-0)  Elementary Yoruba II: A continuation of YORU 110. The course covers materials beyond the elementary ones included in YORU 110. The course emphasizes contemporary spoken and written Yoruba, as used in present day West Africa.
Prerequisite: YORU 110
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